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KC, I'm curious to know if you ever tried to adapt the lesson for 8th graders. The lesson looks great but it's too much for my 8th graders.


Thank you so much! We are happy you are using this unit in your classroom.


Quite a elaborate work!!
Using in class will be interesting!!


The lessons succinctly outlined in this mini-unit provide a perfect entry point into speeches and argument for my students who need more scaffolding in order to successfully unpack such a dense text. Thank you for creating and sharing it!


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I have a letter from John F. Weeks dated September 4, 1864 to the family of my 3rd great uncle who was killed in the Battle of Jonesboro below Atlanta. The letter describes his friendship with my uncle, how and where he was killed and offers his services as much as to come to the family since he would be discharged soon.


He's right that no Indians were present at the conferences. Good essay, not perfect obviously, however good.


Students may log in using the Register link on the home page. They'll just need to list a teacher's email on the page. If you have any other questions about registering students or the Affiliate School program, please email me at affiliates@gilderlehrman.org.


Fantastic lesson; supports the Common Core AND the arts. Thank you.


The census mentioned in this teaching resource has been written up in William Thorndale, "The Virginia Census of 1619," Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, 33 (Summer 1995): 155-170. The author argues that this census, from the Ferrar Papers at Cambridge University, enumerates the population of the Virginia colony in March-May 1619, prior to the arrival of the 20 Africans reported in August 1619. The document includes 32 Africans.


It was written for the Spring 2007 issue of History Now on American Cities.


Yes, the date 1899 is correct. The photographer was Frances Benjamin Johnston. According to biographer Bettina Berch, Johnston took more than 700 photographs in 1899 for a project documenting public schools in Washington, DC, and this photo of a girls' basketball team was one of them. (Bettina Berch, The Woman behind the Lens: the Life and Work of Frances Benjamin Johnston [Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000], 42.)


This is good! I am going to give it a try next week!


Great stuff on JFK and LBJ


is the date underneath the picture correct


tells what us humans need for survival


Thank you for the feedback- we are glad you find these useful for the classroom.


These are fantastic! A great resource. Thank you!


Hi, this article was very interesting.
Can someone tell me in which year it was written ?
thanks


Will use with unit on World War IS I.


I will be trying this lesson.


Nice high level questions on this one. :)


My school is already an affiliate, but I do not know which person on campus (if he or she is still here) set it up. How do students get access if we do not issue students school email accounts?


check it out


I'm teaching high school kids how to read, so this is very helpful- goes right along with what I know and am trying to do with them. Thank you for putting it in a format that makes sense. Humanities Forever!


I agree with kbodington. Five days on just this? Perhaps it would be beneficial to use this technique with multiple newspaper articles on several events of the time period to allow for greater "content coverage". I'd love to hear from other teachers about this...


We do not have a Spanish version of this document, but we do have other Spanish language documents. Please email our Reference Librarian at reference@gilderlehrman.org if you are interested in receiving a list of these materials.


Is there a Spanish version of this document available? Thanks in advance!


I, too, would like to see the sources for these facts. I would particularly like to see the census data supporting Africans being in Virginia prior to 1619


The amount of contradiction within the ideals of our founding fathers is immensely disturbing.


Wow, you never would believe how after so much teamwork amongst women, blacks, and Native Americans, they still were discriminated against by whites.


this is a good source thanks man!


Dear Jill,
As a former GL state HTOTY, I salute you with great enthusiasm. This is a wonderful honor for you, your district and Delaware. May you continue the fine work that has earned you this distinction.
Barbara Markham
Padua Academy


I am thinking of having my students find quotes from sources that were lifted by Jefferson and written or paraphrased in the text of the Declaration. A comparison to the Declaration of Rights and Grievances from the First Continental Congress for example.


We need a "redeemer president of these United States" perhaps now more than any time since Whitman wrote these words.


These lessons are well written and well received by the students.


My experience too.


This is a very good lesson. Some of the sentences are long and challenging, but it is good to stretch the students.


Hi Richard,
If you email our Reference Librarian at reference@gilderlehrman.org, we can get you that information.


the given articles are very helpful, particularly given that in our country (India), we lack enough materials for many research works.Thanks for your reliable online sources


I would like to read this letter and others associated with it.


Great Job, Jill!! Congratulations!!


Calvin Coolidge was not elected president after "turmoil" of 1919. Warren G. Harding was.


Great plans for young learners.


every morning I have been teaching my 5th graders patriotic songs, I just love that when I actually teach them the lessons they will know the song and now the history. Thank you


I think this is a very interesting lesson. To get the students thinking I started out with a question about what they think happened on that particular day in 1787 and then introduced the lesson. I plan on keeping this for future use.


Looks like an excellent resource, however there is no way that I could dedicate 5 class days to covering one event during this era. My curriculum map would give me one day, at the most, for this topic. And this is clearly the issue as we try to move more literacy into our content areas...we still only have so many minutes a day to teach our content, so something has to give. I will do my best to incorporate literacy strategies, but not at the expense of my content.