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What is would be the guiding instructions on explaining to students the differences between a secular and legal scholar?


This is a letter about my ggggg uncle aylett b coleman how can I see this letter ?


I'm in the 11th grade and I like history about civil war


I certainly like this strategy and will implement it for the 2013-2014 Academic Year.


Had to read this for my AP U.S. summer homework! Very interesting and awesome to learn about!


Roger Williams before banishment to Winthrop.


Lincoln did not leave the Jeffersonian Democrat-republican party it left him. Lincoln from day one realized that his anti slavery efforts were going to require fusion efforts and that he could mold those fusions from discontents from both the Jeffersonian democrats and the egalitarian Whigs. What is fascinating though is the connection to Jackson. Wilentz draws a clear relationship to Jackson's desire to put nationalism ahead of any partisan issue and so does Lincoln. It is just in the present day most students learn a litany of Jackson's racist policies and thus it would be hard for them to comprehend that he was a role model for Lincoln. Thus the project of the teacher begins.


This list really gets to the core of what I try to have my students understand and it helps me to stay the course and focused in my teaching. Thank you


What a wonderful perspective in teaching American History. Too much success.


How did the lesson go? I am planning to use it during the month of Sept 2013 and would like you feedback on how it went. Thanks


I also respect G.L., but I ask you to find a history teacher in this country who has the time to spend 5 days on the Gettysburg Address. I team teach in 8th grade and the English teacher and combined 3 days on it - more than anyone else. 2 days in English to analyze from the standpoint of poetry (8th grade curriculum) and one to analyze, contextualize and discuss from the history perspective.

Efectively this lesson asks students to create their own word cloud, a more engaging and relevant lesson which could be done in 1-2 days.

I do disagree with the previous comment however. The point of asking students to summarize something is to be certain that they understand it. It is extremely important that students be able to summarzie the MEANING of the Gettysburg Address.


Great website with resources for civic engagement of students
http://www.northport.k12.ny.us/~patch/

Sandra Day O'Conner's civic project with simulations and games:
iCivics.org


Student Rights

given discussions with some of you I wanted to share these resources

the NJ Bar puts out two publications about law for students:

The Legal Eagle: this is a general law newsletter for students 6 - 12 (horrible name, i know but has some good articles)

http://www.njsbf.org/educators-and-students/publications/legal-eagle.html

Repsect: this is a journal about law and diversity for students 6 - 12

http://www.njsbf.org/educators-and-students/publications/respect.html

Here are links to recent edition of each that I found pretty helpful (PDFs are attached as well)

The Legal Eagle (Spring 2012) had a really good piece "Can your school control what you post on the internet?" http://www.njsbf.org/images/content/1/1/11461/LegalEagleSpring%202012.pdf

Respect (Fall 2011) which had a good article on Offensive Speech and the first amendment. http://www.njsbf.org/images/content/1/1/11445/respect_fall2011_final%5B2...


Wish you had presented the same data for other regions so that students could draw comparisons with their own states (California in my student's case)


Really a nice photography but I'm astonished to know that the photo still now live instead of long had been passed. Now, I'm enthusiastic to know which camera device was used for the photo snap.
Dalton perry


Metadata:
Grade Level: ELL 9th-10th
Number of class periods: 2
Common Core State Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-101 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-102 Determine the central ideas of information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Unit Overview
This lesson is meant to teach students how personal relationships are utilized to help them achieve their goals and aspirations.

Objective
In what ways can personal relationships be developed to enhance opportunities for success?

Introduction
Tell the students that they will be learning about the impact that a letter of recommendation can have toward a person’s desires and goals by reading the text of a letter from the Governor of Hungary in 1859 written for a Hungarian man seeking refuge in the United States.
Secondly, you will be asking them to write a letter of recommendation for a friend. They must be able to substantiate their ideas in the letter by using true and real life examples. The letter must be written in standard letter writing form utilizing the essential elements of letter writing.

Materials
Common Core State Standards: http//www.corestandards.org
Neil Diamond music, song lyrics: “Coming to America”
Primary source document: Letter of reference by Lajos Kossuth, Dec. 3, 1859. Gilder Lehrman Collection
Reading log graphic organizer—significant ideas, new vocabulary, summation
Poster-Chart: Essential Components of a Letter
Differentiation: samples of additional letters of reference

Vocabulary
bearer, consent, intention, adoptive, acquainted, Representatives, signalized, resolute, patriotism, democratic, principles, emigrate, intolerable, lively, respectability, honourable, certificate, inclined, deserving, arduous, exertions, hereafter

Procedure (Instruction and Assessments)
1. Opening hook: Students will read and listen to the music and song lyrics of Neil Diamond: “Coming to America” as they complete a cloze activity handout. (listening assessment)
2. All students are given a copy of the reference letter text: “An Immigrant from Hungary, 1859”
3. 1st read: Students will stand and participate in a “reading walk about” as they alternately read aloud the text of the reference letter: An Immigrant from Hungary, 1859
4. 2nd read: Students will pair-share read aloud the text with a partner.
5. Students will complete the reading log handout. (reading assessment)
6. Students will use the model chart “Essential Components of a Letter” and label the components on the text handout.
7. Students will write a letter of reference.
An Immigrant from Hungary, 1859
The bearer Mr. Alexis Ludvigh native of Hungary; County of Szepes, is going to the United States America with the consent of his parents, and the intention to make the States his adoptive home. I am well acquainted with his father, who being one of the Representatives of the people to the National Assembly of Hungary 1848 has so much signalized himself by his resolute patriotism, and firm democratic principles, that I selected him to the important trust of a Civil Commissioner of the Government with the main army. He is now in exile like myself; and prefers to see his son emigrate to America, than leave him, under the intolerable rule of Austria. From the friendship I bear to the father, I take a lively interest in the concerns of the son; desire this to testify to his respectability, honourable purposes, and ability, and shall rejoice in learning that this my certificate may have served him as a recommendation, with those in the U.S. who might be inclined to favour with their protection a deserving young gentleman, in the arduous task of getting a start by his own honorable exertions in a foreign land, hereafter his home.
London December 3d. 1859
L. Kossuth
Late Governor of
Hungary


Sorry, but Blinded by the Light is still not the correct version.


I don't know which draft versions of the Declaration exist, if at all, but it would be really thought-provoking to compare Jefferson's draft with the final version after what he called the "mutilations" that had been made to the draft. For example, the reference to the slave trade was deleted in the final version.


Sorry for error


Final Lesson


Lesson plan


i like this a lot.
maybe have a number of the more complex words already underlined and have students in groups look up the meanings and replace with their own words an phrases. these words may or may not be part of the "key words" chosen. this may make the understanding of document even easier to grasp.


It's great that you found the lesson useful. Thank you for the recommendation. You may be happy to know that we are currently adding the Common Core Standards to all of the lessons in our Teaching Literacy through History program including this one.


This text would be very complex for middle school, but worthwhile I believe.


should include the NYS and Common Core Standards; rest of lesson is excellent and extremely useful.


I would like to take this course and please tell me what should I do


i just found your site looking for info.on kaiser steel.my dad worked there for 30 yrs.but never met henry kaiser.thanks for your hard work.


The sources are listed but none of them have a link to the suggested readings for the curriculum.


Too many stories have been written about the "First President", today I had the opportunity to read apart of history that is not often read The Inauguration". I think I will start my American History Class with this speech so that they could make a comparison of the time and the audience that the United States are faced with. A good opportunity to use the comparison contrast map to show the differences, The vocabulary is great!


I will use these questions to start student discussions in my class.


I agree - it's overkill.


I agree Jalair. Once school lets out, with permission from the author, I'm going to try to tailor it for 8th graders.


Hi Kevin,

The Freedom Riders is a large exhibition.

Please feel free to contact me with any further questions at byrne@gilderlehrman.org.

Thanks!
Joanna


Hi Rachel,

The Freedom Riders is a large exhibition, which is loaned to sites for four week periods. Each site is responsible for a flat shipping fee of $1000.

Please note that any NEH funds received as part of the Created Equal project cannot be used as payment for a traveling exhibition.

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact me at byrne@gilderlehrman.org.

Thank you,
Joanna


54 attendees listened to Jim Perkins; accompanied by his wife on dulcimer and daughter on violin, perform a 45 minuter set of Irish Civil War songs. This was followed by a brief military demonstration from members of the Michigan Iron Brigade. Tim Moran, doctoral candidate at Wayne State University, then delivered an excellent discussion on "why does the Civil War still matter".


This site is awesome. I plan on using this to teach my ninth grade honors class.


I wish that this would be tailored to 8th graders


Great lesson! I am currently teaching 2nd grade and I am planning on to using parts of this lesson when I teach about the importance of recycling. I really like the theme,"We are all in this together."


I enjoyed reading about Washington's first inauguration. I consider it to be an important moment in the creation of our government. I've written about this moment in a book about Washington and was glad to see this essay.
Carla Killough McClafferty
author of THE MANY FACES OF GEORGE WASHINGTON: REMAKING A PRESIDENTIAL ICON


Good guided activity to see reasons for exploration


Dear Carol Berkin:
Thank you for presenting this retrospective of Great Inaugural Addresses.
The Gilder Lehrman Institute provides many valuable services, programs, events, etc. so please do not think that I am in any way denigrating the organization.
However, I was dismayed that you did not include one of Ronald Reagan's inaugural addresses. His words became his actions.... He was the real thing.

Please reconsider...... Thank you.


Awesome! Can't wait to try it!


Whenever I begin preparing for a new unit, I visit this list. These questions present the controversial ideas that make class interesting.


Vocabulary is a bit advanced for 10th graders, but will serve as a good introduction to Colonial America.


Hi:

Is this exhibit a large or small one? Thanks!

Kevin