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Earn graduate credit through our live online graduate course, Understanding Lincoln. Enrollment is open until May 27, 2014.

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Online Courses

Please note: Registration for the Summer 2014 offering of Understanding Lincoln has concluded.
Please click here to learn more about our online graduate courses, and discover new offerings as they become available.

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GETTYSBURG, PA (February 11, 2011)—A compelling and insightful book that explores Abraham Lincoln’s evolving ideas about the institution of slavery and the roles of African-Americans was chosen out of 106 top-notch submissions as the 2011 Lincoln Prize recipient.

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Paul Semmes to Emily Semmes, July 9, 1863. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

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Paul Semmes to Emily Semmes, July 9, 1863. (GLC00458)

Abraham Lincoln on Slavery and Race

by Roberta McCutcheon
Resource type: 
Teaching Resource
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Creator: 
Roberta McCutcheon

Background

Slavery played a prominent role in America’s political, social, and economic history in the antebellum era. The “peculiar institution” was at the forefront of discussions ranging from the future of the nation’s economy to western expansion and the admission of new states into the Union. The public discourse in the first half of the nineteenth century exposed the nation’s ambivalence about slavery and race. Politicians were increasingly pressured to make their opinions known, and Abraham Lincoln was no exception.

Objectives

Students will:

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A Look at Slavery through Posters and Broadsides

by Carla Nordstrom
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Teaching Resource
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Carla Nordstrom

Overview

Students will examine posters and broadsides from the 1800s to examine attitudes about slavery in the United States at that time.

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Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


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Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


Why Gilder Lehrman?

Your subscription grants you access to archives of rare historical documents, lectures by top historians, and a wealth of original historical material, while also helping to support history education in schools nationwide. Click here to see the kinds of historical resources to which you'll have access and here to read more about the Institute's educational programs.

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Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


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Myths and Misconceptions: Slavery and the Slave Trade

by Steven Mintz
Resource type: 
Teaching Resource
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Creator: 
Steven Mintz

Slavery and World History

Myth: Slavery is a product of capitalism.
Fact: Slavery is older than the first human records.

Myth: Slavery is a product of Western civilization.
Fact: Slavery is virtually a universal institution.

Myth: Slavery in the non-Western world was a mild, benign, and non-economic institution.
Fact: Slaves were always subject to torture, sexual exploitation, and arbitrary death.

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Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


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Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


Why Gilder Lehrman?

Your subscription grants you access to archives of rare historical documents, lectures by top historians, and a wealth of original historical material, while also helping to support history education in schools nationwide. Click here to see the kinds of historical resources to which you'll have access and here to read more about the Institute's educational programs.

Individual subscription: $25

Click here to sign up for an individual subscription to the Gilder Lehrman site.

Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


Upgrade your Account

We're sorry, but it looks as though you do not have access to the full Gilder Lehrman site.

All K-12 educators receive free subscriptions to the Gilder Lehrman site, and our Affiliate School members gain even more benefits!

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American Slavery and Abolition through Hollywood

by Steven Mintz
Resource type: 
Teaching Resource
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Creator: 
Steven Mintz

Throughout the twentieth century, many influential Hollywood films, from Birth of a Nation and Gone with the Wind to Glory to Amistad, have helped shape the way Americans have thought about slavery and its legacy.

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How to subscribe

Click here to get a free subscription if you are a K-12 educator or student, and here for more information on the Affiliate School Program, which provides even more benefits.

Otherwise, click here for information on a paid subscription for those who are not K-12 educators or students.

Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


Become an Affiliate School to have free access to the Gilder Lehrman site and all its features.

Click here to start your Affiliate School application today! You will have free access while your application is being processed.

Individual K-12 educators and students can also get a free subscription to the site by making a site account with a school-affiliated email address. Click here to do so now!

Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


Why Gilder Lehrman?

Your subscription grants you access to archives of rare historical documents, lectures by top historians, and a wealth of original historical material, while also helping to support history education in schools nationwide. Click here to see the kinds of historical resources to which you'll have access and here to read more about the Institute's educational programs.

Individual subscription: $25

Click here to sign up for an individual subscription to the Gilder Lehrman site.

Make Gilder Lehrman your Home for History


Upgrade your Account

We're sorry, but it looks as though you do not have access to the full Gilder Lehrman site.

All K-12 educators receive free subscriptions to the Gilder Lehrman site, and our Affiliate School members gain even more benefits!

How to Subscribe

K-12 educator or student? Click here to edit your profile and indicate this, giving you free access, and here for more information on the Affiliate School Program.

Not a educator or student? Click here for more information on purchasing a subscription to the Gilder Lehrman site.

by Annette Gordon-Reed

Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest in, and historical scholarship about, American slavery.More »

by Sylvia R. Frey