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Pickering, Timothy (1745-1829) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.01614 Author/Creator: Pickering, Timothy (1745-1829) Place Written: Verplanck, New York Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 16 September 1782 Pagination: 2 p. : address : docket ; 22.8 x 18.4 cm.

Written from Camp Verplank's Point, present-day Verplanck, New York. Thinks "it will be practicable to support the number of horses you mention as requisite for the duty at West Point. At present the number of horses actually there is twenty two, some of them clearly not necessary at the post." Asks Knox to remove the unnecessary horses from the post. Also discusses the difficulty in procuring forage in the area of West Point, especially for the coming winter, and has made arrangements to obtain some. "Public service" written on address leaf.

Camp Verplank's Point Septr. 16. 1782

Sir
I have received your favour of yesterday. I think it will be practicable to support the number of horses you mention as requisite for the duty at West Point. At present the number of horses actually there is twenty two, some of them clearly not necessary at the post. Mr Carthy can give you a return of them. You will oblige me by causing all the horses you judge not absolutely necessary [inserted: for duty] to be removed from the Point. Some parts of the Clove will be able to keep them; and they will be within reach of their owners.
The forming magazines of forage was one of the first objects of my attention when I joined the army, that the winter's supply, particularly for West Point, might be laid up before the river or the roads became difficult to pass: but my disappointments as to the money requisite for this purpose have occasioned delays; and without money, after the failure in former engagements, I have found the most extreme difficulty and vexation [2] vexation in procuring any forage whatever. I have now received a little money, a large proportion of which I am obliged to pay down for forage, or the French army would sweep away every ounce in these parts. But as my dependance for our Winter's supply is chiefly on Ulster County, Colo Lutterlok is to go thither to-day, with some money and bank notes, to distribute among my old creditors, & thus induce them to yield further supplies. He will instruct Mr. Coldclough about the purchase of forage, particularly to procure a stock sufficient for West Point, if to be obtained with the means & on the assurances I am able [inserted: to] give. I persuade myself he will succeed.
I am Sir
yr most obed.t servt.
Tim. Pickering QM.G.

M. Genl. Knox.

[address leaf]
Honble. Major Genl. Knox
West Point

[docket]
From Colo Pickering 16.
Septr 1782 -

[free frank]
(public service)

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