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Peirce, John (fl. 1784-1787) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03678 Author/Creator: Peirce, John (fl. 1784-1787) Place Written: Richmond, Virginia Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 21 October 1787 Pagination: 1 p. : address : docket ; 22.4 x 18.5 cm.

Summary of Content: Discusses the sentiments of the people of Virginia as well as the state Assembly and Senate in regards to the Constitution. "The People of this state appear to be principally in favor of the constitution: but I think that a great part of the Gentlemen and Politicians of the country are against it. The leading members in the Assembly are also against it - among which are Patrick Henry, Colo. Bland and others... " Says the governor [Edmund Randolph] "feels his character interested in its destruction." Says there will be a meeting held next Thursday to decide if they should hold a convention. Stamped "Richmond, Octr 22." "Free" stamped on address leaf with no signature.

Full Transcript: [draft]
Richmond October 21 1787
D Sir
The People of this state appear to be principally in favor of the constitution; but I think that a great part of the Gentlemen and ...Politicians of the country are against it. the leading members in the Assembly are also against it - among which are Patrick Henry, Colo. Bland, and others. there are but two in the senate in favor of it. the Governor does not appear, but feels his character interested in its destruction, his friends & connexions are therefore generally against it. Mr [Mayson] has taken the utmost pains to disseminate the reasons of his dissent, in which he has condemned every part of the constitution, and undertaken to [struck: proof] proving the destruction of the liberty of the people in consequence of it. next Thursday the question of calling a convention is to be taken. the well wishers hope to obtain this. but their opponents think that the Assembly will not consent to it, unless the convention are allowed [expressly], to make such alterations as they may think proper. Sam Shaw in Maryland will oppose it.
When I was at Annapolis I enquired if the warrant of 10,000 Dols which had been negotiated by Beatty had been paid. I found it was in full on the 7th of Septemr. It wou'd have been happy had [he] been informed that this money was to have been obtained so easy.
I am Sir respectfully
Your Obt. Servt
Jno Peirce
[address leaf]
Major General Knox
Secrety at War
New York.
[docket]
John Peirce Esqr
Richmond 21 Octr 1787
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People: Peirce, John, 1750-1798

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: US ConstitutionGovernment and CivicsFederalistsPoliticsRatification

Sub Era: Creating a New Government

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