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Washington, George (1732-1799) to Magistrates of Philadelphia re: his respect for civil authority & liberty

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC03344 Author/Creator: Washington, George (1732-1799) Place Written: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Type: Autograph letter signed Date: [ 17 December 1781 ] Pagination: 2 p. + blank 23 x 19 cm

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC03344 Author/Creator: Washington, George (1732-1799) Place Written: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Type: Autograph letter signed Date: [ 17 December 1781 ] Pagination: 2 p. + blank 23 x 19 cm

Summary of Content: Washington writes that he feels pleased by their praise and notes how he has endeavored to avoid violating liberty and civil authority. Written six months before being approached by Lewis Nicola with a plan to make Washington the king of the United States.

Background Information: Signer of the U.S. Constitution.

Full Transcript: To - The Worshipful the Magistrates of the City of Philadelphia

Gentlemen
I return you my thanks for this very polite and affectionate address.
As I have ever considered a ...due support of civil authority, essential to the preservation of that liberty for which we are contending, I have from duty as well as from inclination endeavoured, as far as possible, to avoid the least violation of it, and I am happy to find that my conduct has met the approbation of [2] those who are appointed Guardians of the Rights of a free People.
I feel myself highly obliged by your assurance that it will be the pleasing employment of the Citizens to render my residence among them agreeable. It shall be my study to merit so kind a mark of their attention & to approve myself.
Gent[leme]n
Y[ou]r Most Obed[ien]t & Most H[um]ble Serv[an]t,
Go: Washington
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People: Washington, George, 1732-1799

Historical Era: American Revolution, 1763-1783

Subjects: PresidentCivil RightsLibertyRevolutionary WarRevolutionary War GeneralContinental ArmyMilitary HistoryLawGovernment and Civics

Sub Era: The War for Independence

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