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Beauregard, G. T. (Gustave Toutant) (1818-1893) [Message rallying troops before an anticipated battle at Corinth, with illegible signature]

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC04593 Author/Creator: Beauregard, G. T. (Gustave Toutant) (1818-1893) Place Written: Corinth, Mississippi Type: Printed document Date: 2 May 1862 Pagination: 1 p. : 20.5 x 13 cm.

Calls on the "Soldiers of Shiloh and Elkhorn" to "drive back into the Tennessee the presumptuous mercenaries collected for our subjugation." Tells his men "We are about to meet once more, in the shock of battle, the invaders of our soil, the despoilers of our homes, the disturbers of our family ties. Face to face, hand to hand, we are to decide whether we are to be freemen, or the slaves of those who are free only in name...Let the impending battle decide our fate, and add one more illustrious page to the history of our Revolution; one to which our children will point with noble pride, saying: 'Our fathers were at the battle of Corinth.'" Beauregard took command of this army during the Battle of Shiloh, after which the Confederate forces returned to Corinth. The Union forces pursued them, and an attack was expected in early May. However the delaying tactics used by Beauregard and the general caution of the Union advance caused a twenty mile march to take one month. By the time the Union actually arrived at Corinth, Beauregard had decided to abandon the city. While skirmishes occurred outside the city during the Union advance, no major struggle occurred at Corinth. Beauregard also mentions the siege of Yorktown which has just begun. Illegible signature.

To be read to each cmpy

Head Quarters of the Forces,
CORINTH, MISS., May 2, 1862.
SOLDIERS OF SHILOH AND OF ELKHORN:
We are about to meet once more, in the shock of battle, the invaders of our soil, the despoilers of our homes, the disturbers of our family ties. Face to face, hand to hand, we are to decide whether we are to be freemen, or the vile slaves of those who are free only in name; and who but yesterday were vanquished, although in largely superior numbers, in their own encampments - on the ever memorable field of Shiloh. Let the impending battle decide our fate, and add one more illustrious page to the history of our Revolution; one to which our children will point with noble pride, saying: "Our fathers were at the battle of Corinth."
I congratulate you on your timely junction, your mingled banners. For the first time in this war, we shall meet our foe in strength that should give us victory.
Soldiers, can the result be doubtful? Shall we not drive back into the Tennessee the presumptuous mercenaries collected for our subjugation? One more manly effort, and trusting in God and the justness of our cause, we shall recover more than we have lately lost! Let the sound of our victorious guns be re-echoed by those of the Army of Virginia on the historic battle-field of Yorktown.
G.T. BEAUREGARD,
- OFFICIAL - General Commanding
Jno M Otey
[illegible]

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