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Hamilton, Alexander (1755-1804) to James McHenry re: election, Adams, political dispositions (signed "AH")

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07280 Author/Creator: Hamilton, Alexander (1755-1804) Place Written: New York, New York Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 27 August 1800 Pagination: 3 p. : docket ; 24.5 x 19.8 cm

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07280 Author/Creator: Hamilton, Alexander (1755-1804) Place Written: New York, New York Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 27 August 1800 Pagination: 3 p. : docket ; 24.5 x 19.8 cm

He writes of the upcoming election: "We fight Adams on very unequal grounds-because we do not declare the motives of our dislike. The exposition of these is very important but how? I would make it & put my name to it, but I cannot do it without it being conclusively inferred that as to my material fails I must have derived my information from ... the Administration. Yet without this, we have the air of mere caballers & shall be complete run down in the public opinion." Signed with initials.

Signer of the U.S. Constitution.

New York Aug 27 1800

Indeed, My Dear MacH, I have not enough the gift of second sight to forsee what N England will do. The mass of the people there are attached to Adams and the leader of the Second class pretty generally. The leaders of the first class pretty generally promote the joint support of Adams and Pickney either because they dislike Adams or hate and fear Jefferson. Upon the whole I believe though not with perfect assurance that Pinckney will have almost all the votes of NE - Adams will have all -

The State of New Jersey is more uncertain that I could wish. Parties will be too nicely balanced there. But our friends continue confident of a favourable result. If the Electors in this State are Federal they will certainly vote for Pinckney, and I rather think will do with respect to Mr. Adams what may be thought right.

In New York there is no chance for any Federal Candidate.

I think at all events Maryland had better choose by the Legislature. If we have a majority of Federal votes throughout we can certainly exclude Jefferson and if we please bring the question between Adams and Pinckney to the House of Representatives.

We fight Adams on very unequal ground - because we do not declare the motives of our dislike. The exposition of these is very important but how? I would make it and put my name to it - but I cannot do it without it being conclusively inferred that as to my material fails I must have derived my information from members of the Administration. Yet without this, we have the air of mere caballers and shall be complete run down in the public opinion.

I have written a letter of which I shall send a copy to you another to Wolcott. If I am not forbidden, Col. Ogden to whom it will be addressed will commit it to the News Papers.

Yours truly and affecting
AH

P.S. I have concluded to send the enclosed to you instead of Major Jackson.
Yrs.

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