January 31 – March 11, 2013 Location: Robert T. Matsui Courthouse (hosted by McClatchy High School), 501 I Street, Sacramento, CA
Location: 
Robert T. Matsui Courthouse (hosted by McClatchy High School), 501 I Street, Sacramento, CA

Panel exhibition that documents and illustrates critical figures and events while tracing the evolving concept of freedom from the founding of the United States through 1968. Among the highlights are a rare 1776 printing of the Declaration of Independence; a secretly printed draft and official copy of the US Constitution; Lincoln’s handwritten notes for several speeches; and letters by leading figures such as Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, and Martin Luther King Jr.

January 14 – February 5, 2013 Location: Ridgeview Charter Middle School, 5340 Trimble Road, Sandy Springs, GA
Location: 
Ridgeview Charter Middle School, 5340 Trimble Road, Sandy Springs, GA

The panel exhibition Looking at Lincoln explores images, especially cartoons, as a way of investigating Abraham Lincoln in the context of his times. These cartoons are vividly biting; they invite us to put aside twenty-first-century assumptions and look at events through the eyes of people living in the era. Among the highlights are a California printing of the Emancipation Proclamation signed by Abraham Lincoln and political cartoons relating to the election of 1860.

January 14 – 28, 2013 Location: African American Museum of Nassau County, 110 North Franklin Street, Hempstead, NY
Location: 
African American Museum of Nassau County, 110 North Franklin Street, Hempstead, NY

The panel exhibition Looking at Lincoln explores images, especially cartoons, as a way of investigating Abraham Lincoln in the context of his times. These cartoons are vividly biting; they invite us to put aside twenty-first-century assumptions and look at events through the eyes of people living in the era. Among the highlights are a California printing of the Emancipation Proclamation signed by Abraham Lincoln and political cartoons relating to the election of 1860.

July 31 – August 28, 2012 Location: Stanley Whitman House, Farmington, CT
Location: 
Stanley Whitman House, Farmington, CT

Free at Last: A History of the Abolition of Slavery in America investigates the question of how slavery in America developed into an institution, and how it came to be condemned as it divided the nation during the Civil War. Visitors can explore an early fragment of Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech, letters by abolitionists and slaves, and personal letters from soldiers who fought in the Civil War.

July 3 – 31, 2012 Location: Grinnell, Iowa
Location: 
Grinnell, Iowa

In the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson based the colonists’ right to separate on the King’s denial of their freedom—their “inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”. Yet for over 225 years, the principle of freedom and our understanding of its implications have evolved.  The debates, decisions, and battles of our past shape the United States in which we live today. The exhibition invites the modern-day viewer into the lives of the men and women who forged this nation, whether they arrived in this land by choice or in chains.

July 16, 2012 Location: Pasadena, TX
Location: 
Pasadena, TX

Professor Craig Symonds will lead this teacher workshop on Abraham Lincoln.

June 28, 2012 Location: Providence, RI
Location: 
Providence, RI

Professor Jim Oakes will lead a teacher workshop on the abolition movement and the emancipation of slaves.

June 19 – 20, 2012 Location: Goshen, IN
Location: 
Goshen, IN

Professors John Stauffer and Zoe Trodd will lead a workshop for teachers on expansion, reform, disunion, and the Underground Railroad.

May 14 – June 11, 2012 Location: North Valley Regional Library, Anthem, AZ
Location: 
North Valley Regional Library, Anthem, AZ

More books have been written about Lincoln than any other American, yet public knowledge about our most famous president is dominated by a series of iconic images: the son of an illiterate frontier farmer who taught himself to read; the savior of the Union; the Great Emancipator; the martyred leader.

July 31 – August 8, 2012 Location: Online
Location: 
Online

The course will explore the Civil War and Reconstruction with Dickinson College scholar and Gilder Lehrman Teacher Seminar historian Matthew Pinsker. Online course meetings will take place on five days: July 31, August 1, August 2, August 7, and August 8.

To read more and apply for the course (applications accepted until June 1), please visit this link: http://www.gilderlehrman.org/programs-exhibitions/online-courses