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Hancock, John (1737-1793) to New Jersey Convention re: announcing Declaration of Independence

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC00154.01 Author/Creator: Hancock, John (1737-1793) Place Written: Philadelphia Type: Letter signed Date: 5 July 1776 Pagination: 2 p. : docket : address ; 32 x 20 cm

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC00154.01 Author/Creator: Hancock, John (1737-1793) Place Written: Philadelphia Type: Letter signed Date: 5 July 1776 Pagination: 2 p. : docket : address ; 32 x 20 cm

Ex-collection Leon Becker. Stamps on verso: "Sold by Merchantile Library" [red stamp] "Tomlinson Collection" [purple stamp]. With docket on p.2

Notes: E. Burnett, Letters of Members of the Continental Congress Volume 2, letter 1. Gloucester, Mass: Carnegie Institution of Washington 1923, 1963.

Philadelphia July 5th. 1776.
Gentlemen,
You will perceive by the enclosed Resolves, that Congress have judged it necessary to remove the Prisoners from your Colony [inserted: to York Town] in [struck: to] Pennsylvania, and have directed me to request you, to carry the same into Execution immediately. Their Vicinity to our Enemies - and the Opportunities of deserting to them, or keeping up a Communication dangerous to the Interest of these American States, rendered this Step, not only prudent, but absolutely necessary.
I do myself the Honour to enclose, in Obedience to the Commands of Congress, a copy of the Declaration of Independence, which you will please to have proclaimed in your Colony, in such Way and Manner as you shall judge best.
The important Consequences to the American States from this Declaration [2] of Independence, considered as the Ground & Foundation of a future Government, will naturally suggest the Propriety of proclaiming it in such a Mode, as that the People may be universally informed of it.
I have the Honour to he
Gentlemen,
your most obd.t
& very hble Serv
John Hancock Presidt
Honble Convention of New Jersey.

[docket]
A letter from John
Hancock E/qr inclosing
Declr of Independence &
Resolves Respecting
Prisoners of War
Recd. 6 July 1776

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