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Adams, John (1735-1826) to James Searle

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC00529.02 Author/Creator: Adams, John (1735-1826) Place Written: New York Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 15 May 1789 Pagination: 2 p. ; 32.4 x 20 cm.

Written by Adams as vice president to Searle, a former Continental Congressman, who was involved in business in Philadelphia. Says he is happy to hear of Searle's success and happiness in business. Says it was one piece of good news he has received recently and claims, "My Correspondence has Served to little other purpose than to pour out before me the Griefs Complaints and Distresses of my Friends and the Friends of their Country, whose Ruin has been accomplished in Part by the turn of affairs at the Revolution and in part by the bad Policy of our Country, Since the Peace. " Asks Searle not to visit him in New York until he has his house in order.

New York May 15, 1789
Dear Sir
I received your friendly Letter last Evening, and thank you for your kind Remembrance, of your Old Friend.
To hear of your Success and Prosperity in Business; the Independence of your Circumstances, and the Contentment of your heart, gives me a Pleasure, the more exquisite, as it is so rare. - It is almost the Single Instance, that I have received Since my Return to America. My Correspondence has served to little other purpose than to pour out before me the Griefs Complaints and Distresses of my Friends and the Friends of their Country, whose Ruin [2] has been accomplished in Part by the turn of Affairs at the Revolution and in part by the bad Policy of our Country, since the Peace.
The friendly disposition, which dictated your desire to come to New York, is very obliging: but I beg you would not come, till I have an house to receive you, and a dinner and a little Wine to share with you; for at present I have neither at my Command: so great a Thing is it to be one, who is, Sir, your most obedient and most humble Servant: not without hopes however of better times.
John Adams
The Hon. James Searle Esqr

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