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Porter, David Dixon (1813-1891) to J.H. Spotts

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC01545.03 Author/Creator: Porter, David Dixon (1813-1891) Place Written: On board Flag Ship Malvern off Hampton Roads, Virginia Type: Letter signed Date: 15 October 1864 Pagination: 1 p. : docket ; 25 x 19.7 cm.

Written in clerical hand, but signed by Rear Admiral Porter as commander of the North Atlantic Blockade Squadron to Commander Spotts as commander of the USS "Pawtuxet." Says a steamship belonging to the navy left Point Lookout for Hampton Roads on 8 October 1864 in the midst of a gale from the northwest. It is assumed she was driven ashore on the Eastern shore of the Chesapeake or has foundered. Orders Spotts to search for her and to make inquiries with other vessels along the way. Wants to see him before he starts the mission. Commissioned in February 1864 as USS Malvern, she was employed for much of the remainder of the Civil War as flagship of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. As such, she was present during the capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina, in January 1865 and received credit for the subsequent capture of the blockade running steamers Charlotte and Stag. During the next month Malvern took part in operations on the Cape Fear River, N.C., and was active in the James River area of Virginia as the Civil War neared its end. Following the fall of Richmond, Va., in early April 1865, she transported President Abraham Lincoln up the James to visit that city, the former capital of the Confederacy.

Commissioned in February 1864 as USS Malvern, she was employed for much of the remainder of the Civil War as flagship of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. As such, she was present during the capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina, in January 1865 and received credit for the subsequent capture of the blockade running steamers Charlotte and Stag. During the next month Malvern took part in operations on the Cape Fear River, N.C., and was active in the James River area of Virginia as the Civil War neared its end. Following the fall of Richmond, Va., in early April 1865, she transported President Abraham Lincoln up the James to visit that city, the former capital of the Confederacy.

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