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Macaulay, Catharine (1731-1791) to Mercy O. Warren

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC01800.06 Author/Creator: Macaulay, Catharine (1731-1791) Place Written: Bracknal Berke, England Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 1 March 1791 Pagination: 4 p. : docket ; 22.5 x 18.5 cm.

Summary of Content: Expresses thanks for her book (which she hasn't yet seen), Macaulay's comments on Burke's Reflections on the French Revolution: "it is a vehement and virulent attack on the French constitution and Legislature for I must tell you that we in general look with a very malignant eye on the progress which our enlightened neighbors are making towards political perfection the [sic] Government because it will oblige them to keep within some bounds of moderation towards their own subjects[.]" Macaulay adds: "I look with impatience for yr history of the American Revolution because I expect it will be the most authentic account of that grand event with sagacious reflection on the subject of genuine liberty."

Background Information: Catharine Macaulay was a historian and activist in England's radical political circles. She became a frequent correspondent of many colonists and often met with those who came to England. Macaulay ...shared the colonists' updates of revolutionary activities. She toured the United States with her second husband, William Graham, from 1784 to 1785, visiting Mercy and James Warren in Massachusetts. They also traveled as far south as Mount Vernon for a ten-day sojourn with George Washington, during which Macaulay examined his papers relating to the Revolution.See More

Full Transcript: Dear Madam
It is long since I Have had the pleasure of hearing from you so long indeed that I should have felt a good deal of uneasiness but yr ...health [struck: should have] [inserted: had] been affected [struck: if I had] [inserted: did I] not flatter[struck: ed] my self that yr attention to the important work in which you are now engaged had ever prevented you from diverting it into any other channel
I have lately been informed that [struck: their] [inserted: there] is a parcel for me laying at Mr Dillys my Bookseller. I have not yet seen it but I hear it contains a vol of your excelent poems [2] this agreable intelligence gave me [struck: great pleasure] [inserted and struck: on the account] [struck: of the one] [inserted: a double pleasure both] to be in the possession of my Dear friends literary performance and [inserted: on] [struck: the other at] receiving this cordial mark of her friendship I am also in hopes that I shall find a letter among the contents of the parcel
With this letter you will receive my observations on Mr Burkes reflections on the french revolution a work so rich has been much admired and eagerly read in this country was [illegible] will you be surprised at this when you find that it is a vehement and virulent attack on the French constitution and Legislature for I must tell you that we in general look with a very malignent eye on the progress which our enlightened [3] Neighbors are making towards political perfection the Government because it will oblige them to keep within some bounds of moderation towards their own subjects the Civil and Ecclesiastical Aristocrats from a principle of interest and the large majority of the people from a petulant resentment against the French [struck: from] [inserted: on] the contempt they have shown in their variations of the English government [strikeout: whom] [inserted: which] the Nation has been taught to adore as a model of perfection that never was equaled and which never can be surpassed
I look with impatience for yr history of the American Revolution because I expect it will be the most authentic account of [inserted: ?] grand event and that it will be interspersed with sa [4] gacious reflections on the subject of genuine liberty
Mr Graham joins me in affect respects to yr self and Genl Warren
From Dear Madam
Yr Most sincere Friend
And Obedt Servt
Cath: Maccaulay Graham
Bracknal Berke
1st March. 1791
[docket:]
March 1791
Mrs Warren
Massachussets
See More

People: Graham, Catharine S. Macaulay, 1731-1791
Warren, Mercy Otis, 1728-1814
Burke, Edmund, 1729-1797

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: Women's HistoryLiterature and Language ArtsGlobal History and US Foreign PolicyGlobal History and US Foreign PolicyFrench RevolutionGovernment and CivicsRevolutionary War

Sub Era: The Early Republic

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