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Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland) (1808-1873) to William P. Fessenden

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02286 Author/Creator: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland) (1808-1873) Place Written: Columbus, Ohio Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 4 March 1858 Pagination: 1 p. : docket ; 21 x 13 cm.

Summary of Content: Praises a speech of Fessenden and mentions that in order for the Republicans to win the election in 1860, they will need to keep together on their own principles. Comments on the opinions of Stephen Douglas, "The Douglas notion of a popular Sovereignty incapable during the whole period of territorial existence of freeing itself from slavery and then, at the initiative of State existence indifferent whether slave or free, but only asking the privilege of saying which, will never do to form a party upon." Written as Governor of Ohio on State of Ohio, Executive Department stationery.

Full Transcript: Columbus, Mar. 4, 1858.
Dear Sir,
I thank you for your speech - all good - but the last part best, because, at this time, most needed. If we are to achieve ...a victory in 1860, the Republican Party must be kept together on its own principles as proclaimed at Philadelphia and seek not combinations with factions but accessions of men. Your service, in recalling and fixing public attention to the character of the repeal of the Prohibition was therefore timely. The Douglas notion, of a popular Sovereignty incapable during the whole period of territorial existence of freeing itself from slavery & then, at the initiation of State Existence indifferent whether slave or free, but only asking the privilege of saying which, will never do to form a party upon it.
Is your father yet living. I remember him with great attachment as personally kind to me & one of the noblest pioneers of the Cause I love.

Hon. W. P. Fessenden. Yours most truly,
S P Chase.
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People: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873
Fessenden, William Pitt, 1806-1869

Historical Era: National Expansion and Reform, 1815-1860

Subjects: Republican PartyGovernment and CivicsPoliticsElectionSlaveryAfrican American HistoryGovernment and Civics

Sub Era: Age of Jackson

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