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Barry, William Farquhar (1818-1879) to Henry Jackson Hunt

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02382.012 Author/Creator: Barry, William Farquhar (1818-1879) Place Written: Falmouth, Virginia Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 3 December 1862 Pagination: 4 p. ; 20.1 x 25 cm.

Headquarters Inspector of Artillery, U.S.A. letterhead. Says that Burnside sent seven 4 1/2 inch siege guns to Hunt the day of his request. The original request had only been refused because Hunt had specified the guns were to be taken from the "Forts about Washington." Says that "if subordinate officers are communicated with direct; I do not see the justice of holding their superiors to account for any supposed short coming." Notes that Stonewall Jackson "is not the bugbear here that you seem to think he is: indeed, not so much consideration would be given him as is really the case were it not for the constantly recurring alarming reports regarding his whereabouts sent here by generals belonging to, and on duty with, the Army of the Potomac." Is gratified that Hunt has managed to check "what promised to be the utter destruction of the Horse Art[iller]y." Discusses a circular issued by Hunt re field batteries. Comments on the "disgust" of several officers when they learn that DeRussy has been appointed brigadier general in lieu of them. A career artillerist, New Yorker William F. Barry served as the artillery chief for McClellan and Sherman. An 1838 West Point graduate, he had seen artillery service during the Seminole and Mexican wars as well as during the Kansas disturbance. He was the chief artillerist at the 1st Bull Run disaster and during the unsuccessful Peninsula Campaign. After a year and a half in the defenses of the capital he was transferred west to direct Sherman's guns. He served through the Atlanta Campaign, the March to the Sea, and the Carolinas Campaign.

A career artillerist, New Yorker William F. Barry served as the artillery chief for McClellan and Sherman. An 1838 West Point graduate, he had seen artillery service during the Seminole and Mexican wars as well as during the Kansas disturbance. He was the chief artillerist at the 1st Bull Run disaster and during the unsuccessful Peninsula Campaign. After a year and a half in the defenses of the capital he was transferred west to direct Sherman's guns. He served through the Atlanta Campaign, the March to the Sea, and the Carolinas Campaign.

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