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Tyler, Robert Ogden (1831-1874) to Alexander Doull

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02382.013 Author/Creator: Tyler, Robert Ogden (1831-1874) Place Written: Stafford County, Virginia Type: Letter Date: 6 December 1862 Pagination: 1 p. ; 20.9 x 13 cm.

United States Military Telegram. Lt. Jackson will start immediately with the seven guns [possibly the siege guns cited in GLC02382.012]; can't send ammunition yet as the track is broken. In preparation for the Fredericksburg campaign. A career artillerist, West Pointer (1853) Robert Tyler spent most of the war directing heavy guns. A first lieutenant in the 3rd Artillery, Tyler had served as a captain and assistant quartermaster. He was largely responsible for converting the 4th Connecticut into the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. In charge of the siege train during McClellan's disastrous Peninsula Campaign, Tyler managed to save all but one gun. After serving in the Washington defenses, he commanded some of the artillery. At Chancellorsville and Gettysburg and in the Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns Tyler was responsible for farming out his batteries to the most-needed places. Doull served as an inspector of artillery. Written in Aquia Creek, Virginia, located in Stafford County.

A career artillerist, West Pointer (1853) Robert Tyler spent most of the war directing heavy guns. A first lieutenant in the 3rd Artillery, Tyler had served as a captain and assistant quartermaster. He was largely responsible for converting the 4th Connecticut into the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. In charge of the siege train during McClellan's disastrous Peninsula Campaign, Tyler managed to save all but one gun. After serving in the Washington defenses, he commanded some of the artillery. At Chancellorsville and Gettysburg and in the Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns Tyler was responsible for farming out his batteries to the most-needed places. Doull served as an inspector of artillery. Hunt was Chief of the Artillery for the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War.

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