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Knox, Henry (1750-1806) to Lucy Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.00635 Author/Creator: Knox, Henry (1750-1806) Place Written: s.l. Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 12 August 1777 Pagination: 3 p. : address : docket ; 32.4 x 19.7 cm.

Written in camp twenty miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Expresses his happiness that Lucy has spent time in Newburyport, Massachusetts: "The Gentlemen there with whom I am acquainted, are in my opinion some of the most virtuous public spirited, patriots on the Continent." Reports that British General William Howe might be sailing toward the Chesapeake Bay. Disbelieves the Chesapeake is Howe's target. Asserts instead that Howe intends to sail for the North River (the Hudson) or Philadelphia. Discusses Howe's movements and comments on the extremely hot weather. Referring to British General John Burgoyne, writes "Mr. Burgoyne will push himself untill he finds a stone wall to break his head against- I hope that will not be too soon untill all parts of the Machine may harmonize which is to work his destruction..." Referring to his brother William, writes "Master Bill bears the fatigues of the Campaign like a soldier and they are not very few..."

Camp 20 miles from Philadelphia 12 Augt

I received your letter from Newbury port of the 29th ultimo - It gives me great pleasure that my dear Lucy, went in such agreeable Company and to a place for which I have a peculiar respect - The Gentlemen [inserted: there] with whom I am acquainted, are in my opinion some of the most virtuous, public spirited, patriots on the Continent - and [struck: were] [inserted: when] I do return to my Lucy again I may have some serious thoughts of settling there - I am glad of the happiness which results from the Connection you find with Mrs Smith & family - Mr Howe took his departure from them Capes on the 31st instant nor has been heard off [struck: since] untill 2 days ago an express arriv'd with news of his being off Sinepuxent [county] to the South suppos'd for Cheasapeak Bay - This if true, (which I am much inclind to disbelieve) must be a feint - either the NRiver or Philadelphia must be his object - I should
suppose
[2] if he pursued his true interest that the [post of N York] to be the immediate design of his attention - but he reasons for himself, and its my opinion that this summer he reasons himself out of America - we were going up to Corryells Ferry [strikeout] supposing the enemy were gone eastward, but we are now stopp'd until we hear further - The season here is infinitely hot - too hot for good Whigs - it almost makes me believe the materiality of - Fire - Tis a Sweet consolation my Love that our two Souls are so firmly rivetted to each other. - Yes I am attach'd to you by all the powers of my mind [strikeout] for life -
Mr Burgoyne will push himself untill he finds a stone wall to break his head against - I hope that will not be too soon untill all parts of the Machine may harmonize which is to work his destruction - if the Genius of America Guards her this Campaign, all of the misfortunes which we have felt all be only blessings in disguise.
how does Mrs. Jarvis [3] and her Whig Gallant - Give my love to them - Master Bill bears the fatigues of the Campaign like a Soldier, and they are not very few - for we live like soldiers though not to the greatest hardships - But I [illegible] if we do not before the Campaign ends bear, them in the extreme.
- Both ships the Tatar and hero are out You do not like the scheme - I am sorry for it - I do if it succeeds if not I shall dislike it - War is nothing - and I can see no reason why [individuals] may not make war as ever on his own account as to assist it on account of the public - I must sincerely and devoutly pray the great Governor of the World to take you into his kind keeping - and am your what truly affectionate
Harry Knox

Mrs Knox
[address leaf]
To
Mrs Lucy Knox
Boston
[docket]
12th August

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