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Knox, Henry (1750-1806) to Lucy Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.00648 Author/Creator: Knox, Henry (1750-1806) Place Written: Schuykill, Pennsylvania Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 13 September 1777 Pagination: 2 p. : docket ; 32 x 20.6 cm.

Written at "Camp near Schuylkill." Opens with various declarations of how he misses her, including "War nor none of its concomitant Horrors is sufficient to put my Lucy from my mind..." Reports of a recent engagement with the enemy, the Battle of Brandywine (11 September 1777), declaring "...we were oblig'd to retire, after very considerable slaughter of the enemy... if they advance we shall fight them again before they get possession of Philadelphia but of this they will be cautious- my corps did me great honor they behav'd like men..." Encloses an account (not present) he sent to the President of an unspecified council. Docketed on page one.

While Knox does not mention the Battle of Brandywine by name, it occurred just prior to the writing of Knox's letter, and he is writing from Schuylkill, in Pennsylvania, near the scene of the battle. Other campaigns, such as the Saratoga campaign in upstate New York, were being waged at the same time.

Camp near Schuylkill 13 Septr 1777
My dearest Life
most willingly would your Harry releive all Your cares and anxiety on this and on every other account, chearfully would he take them on his own shoulders for the sake You whom he loves more than Life. I received your kind Letter I beleive by Mr Livingston altho deliver'd to me by another hand - the irregularity of the posts [strikeout] has prevented my writing in proper time to you. But my heart did not omit communicating with yours. I [struck: frequently] [inserted: always] console myself with the conversation of my Love - War nor none of its concomitant Honors is sufficient to put my Lucy from my mind for a moment.
My dear Girl will be pleas'd to hear of her Harrys safety - Yes my Love - heaven who is our guide has protected him in the day of Battle - you will hear with this letter of the most severe action that has been fought this war between our army and the enemy [2] our people behav'd well but Heaven frown'd on us in a degree - we were oblig'd to retire, after very considerable slaughter of the enemy - they dar'd not pursue a single step - if they advance we shall fight them again before they Get possession of Philadelphia but of this they will be cautious - My corps did me great honor they behav'd like men - contending for everything thats valuable - except my writing You a long letter - inclos'd you have the account which I have sent to the president of the Council - I shall have the [happiness] to be with you in two months most certainly - I regret it to be so long but its impossible to quit.
I am with the utmost attachment that the human heart is capable of
Yours most Affectionately
H Knox
[strikeout]

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