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Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03420 Author/Creator: Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) Place Written: Boston, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 21 January 1787 Pagination: 4 p. : docket ; 33.1 x 20.3 cm.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03420 Author/Creator: Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) Place Written: Boston, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 21 January 1787 Pagination: 4 p. : docket ; 33.1 x 20.3 cm.

Writes that the insurgents are "most cursedly frightened, & wish themselves to the devil." Some of the insurgents went to see the Governor to ask that the troops not be deployed to stop the upcoming siege on the General Court; they promised the insurgents would not stop the court from sitting. They were too late, however, and the troops set off to march as planned. Provides some detail about where they were quartered and where they traveled. Explains that the troops are to track down the leaders of the insurgents if they do not stand and fight. Declares that it "is more like the year 75 than any thing I have seen since." Sends the compliments of General [Benjamin] Lincoln, who has set off with a "very respectable" command. Says he is very distressed by Knox's statement that Jackson and his officers should not become involved in the fight against the insurgents without orders from Knox or Congress. Several of his officers have already joined Lincoln's expedition and it is too late to recall them, but he suspects there will not be any actual fighting. Docketing notes that letter is a copy.

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