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Breck, Samuel (1747-1809) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03604 Author/Creator: Breck, Samuel (1747-1809) Place Written: Boston, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 14 July 1787 Pagination: 4 p. : docket ; 22.5 x 19 cm.

Summary of Content: Briefly discusses events concerning mutual friends. Emphasizes his support for the idea of a stronger federal government. States, "I fully agree with you in the necessity of a National Government & hope that a system, in some measure resembling ours, will be adopted, which operating upon the large scale must, in a relative view, reduce the powers of each state to that of our Counties, such a government in my humble opinion would extend its authority over all these petty states & increase in the proportion as they are ... " Adds that a strong central government will help quash rebellion. Also writes that "we have experienced a dangerous insurrection arising from in some part a jealousy between the Country interest & that of Sea Ports, happily however by a fair discussion of this subject in the late session, … the enmity entirely subsided ... " Also discusses [Robert] Morris's narrow extrication from financial collapse.

Full Transcript: [draft]
Dear Sir Boston July 14th.1787.

Your much esteem'd fav. of the 8th instance came to hand yesterday - Mrs. Breck & I am much obliged by your kind expressions of ...friendship for our Son, and are exceedingly flattered with the approbation of M Lt. John & the Ladies, who, have spoken so favourably of his Conduct; This young man mentions with gratitude the civilities shown to him by your Brother, but regrets that his acquaintance commenced only a day previous to his departure from New York, where, on his arrival, finding Mrs Knox & you had gone to Philadelphia, omitted calling at your House.
I [2] am happy to be informed of Mr. Morrises ability to extract himself from the embarrassments which his extensive Commerce has occasioned; every one who considers his merits as I do will be particularly gratified, but all must rejoice that so great a calamity as his failure woud occasion will, by his astonishing abilities & resources be prevented; our friend Jackson has shewn to me your Letter on this subject, I think if extracts of it was judiciously published, it would be of importance to Mr. Morris, of this however Mr. J - is the best judge - I fully agree with you in the necessity of a National Government & hope that a system, in some measure resembling ours, will be adopted, which opperating [sic] upon the large scale must, in a relative view, reduce the powers of each state to that of our Counties; such a Government [3] in my humble opinion would extend its authority over all these Petty States, & increase in the proportion as they are augmented by new ones; perhaps there never was a time more favourable for such a Revolution. The danger to which this commonwealth has been exposed & the Villanous [sic] conduct of the state of Rhode Island will shew the necessity of parting with a greater share of our Priviledges to secure the remainder than we have been willing to do at any former Period. This State will not hesitate to adopt national measures, and I believe no former Court had more just Ideas of them than the present, notwithstanding the Riotous part of it are fully represented; we have experienced a dangerous insurrection arising from [4] in some part from a jealousy between the Country interest & that of Sea Ports, happily however by a fair discussion of this subject in the late Session, during which our friend Doctr. Jarvis discovered great good sense & address, the enmity entirely subsided which I freely confess has given me a very favourable opinion of the candour of our Countrymen - the Doctr. would have been with you in Nov. next as member of Congress had he not absolutely refused going; this however has made way for our worthy friend Mr. Sedgwick, who you Know from prejudices against his profession was neglected last year - make my Compliments to your brother & our other friends - Mrs. Breck joins me in her best regard to Mrs Knox & your young family -
I am, my Dear Sir
Yours Sincerely
Sam Breck

Honourable Henry Knox Esquire-
[docket]
Saml Breck Esqr
14 July 1787
See More

People: Knox, Henry, 1750-1806
Breck, Samuel, 1747-1809
Morris, Robert, 1734-1806

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: Revolutionary War GeneralGovernment and CivicsUS ConstitutionRebellionMobs and RiotsPoliticsFinanceDebtShays' Rebellion

Sub Era: Creating a New Government

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