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Carrington, Edward (1749-1810) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03758 Author/Creator: Carrington, Edward (1749-1810) Place Written: Fredericksburg, Virginia Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 12 January 1788 Pagination: 3 p. : docket ; 23.4 x 19.1 cm.

Carrington reports, "I have as yet passed through no more of this state than what is called the Northern Neck- there I find the opponents of the Constitution pretty numerous and vociferous." Mentions that [Richard Henry] Lee "has in great measure declined to act in the opposition, finding that even his own family have separated from him." Declares that in the southern part of Virginia, many influential figures have united on the "wrong side." Mentions that Governor [Edmund] Randolph has "committed to the public view his opinions as to the conduct which it will be wise now to pursue with respect to the Constitution..." Knox writes beneath the docket: "Answered on the 10th Feby and gave a state of affairs in Massachusetts."

Carrington was a Virginia delegate to the Continental Congress from 1786 to 1788.

[draft]

My dear Sir, Fredericksburg Jan. 12. 1788
I have as yet passed through no more of this state than what is called the Northern Neck - there I find the opponents of the constitution pretty numerous and vociferous - symptoms are however in favor of the measure as to the dispositions of the great mass of the people - Colo. [Mason] is decidedly discarded by a Majority of his late constituents [struck: for] [inserted: in] Fairfax County - so conscious is he that they will not elect him for the Convention that, he has declared himself a Candidate for a neighbouring County, where he is invited by some characters of [struck: some] influence who are with him in opinion; but it is supposed he will not succeed in the election - R. H. Lee has in a great measure declared to act in the opposition, finding that even his own family have separated from [2] him - My accounts from the southern parts of the state are alarming - [struck: so many] so many of the influential characters unite there on the wrong side, that the people must be misled for want of the necessary information - I am unhappily placed in the midst of this influence - so far as my efforts will go to counteract it, they shall be rejected, but it will be hard to [stem] the Torrent folly which must, by this time, be created under [struck: the] such a combination. It is fortunate that the convention is long postponed - by the time it comes into session, it will act under an influence different from that of views of the opponents.
Governor Randolph has fully committed to the public view his opinions as to the conduct which it will be wise now [3] to pursue with respect to the constitution, as well as his reasons for refusing to sign it in Convention - the result is that we ought to adopt it - this publication will be of service, and will doubtless do the writer much honor. I have not a copy at hand, [struck: by] [inserted: but], you will see it in the papers.
When my information is enlarged I shall do myself the pleasure to write you fully, and in the mean time beg you to be assured that I am with great regard,
Your afft. Hbl. St.
Ed. Carrington

Genl Knox

[docket]
from Colo Carrington
12 Jany. 1788 -
answered on the
10th Feby and gave
a state of affairs in
Massachusetts -

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