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Knox, Lucy Flucker (ca. 1756-1824) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03976 Author/Creator: Knox, Lucy Flucker (ca. 1756-1824) Place Written: Trenton, New Jersey Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 24 August 1788 Pagination: 2 p. : address : docket ; 31.8 x 20 cm.

Lucy writes to her husband: "How shall I thank the partner of my soul for the long affectionate letter I have just received from him, that he amid his numerous avocations should find so much time for me, is flattering indeed- but alas that unlucky summons to the breakfast table but for it who knows where the charming immagination [sic] of my Harry might not have led us." Mentions a recent matter in which Knox's friend, Henry Jackson, invested 10,000 of Knox's notes without his permission. Needless to say, Knox was furious, and Lucy offers her thoughts on the subject: "... you speak rightly of your notes I tremble pray my love remember tho he is your ancient friend, yet your property is not yours alone your helpless children and their equally helpless mother look to you for bread for cloathing and what is more your childrens education and setting out in life might be effected by that sum alone." Discusses family, mentioning her sister. Relates that she is staying with friends in Trenton, and recently beat Gouverneur Morris in chess. Instructs Knox to remember the equinox.

Trenton August 24th 88-
To Gen'K at Boston
How shall I thank the partner of my soul for the long affectionate letter I have just received from him, that he amid his numerous avocations should find so much time for me, is flattering indeed- but alass [sic] that unlucky [summons] to the breakfast table but for it who knows where the charming immagination of my Harry might not have led us- now for the letter
A decent attention to Mrs Rand was well enough and perhaps due-but the gratuity to Mrs Smith is far from meeting my approbation nay it gives me pain: had your wife brought you a fortune her [strikeout] [inserted: beging] would wear a [face] of some decency but now I cannot express my feelings upon the occasion and intreat you never to advance a farthing on my account but at my request.
I rejoice at the [flourishing] state of old-Boston- and feel oppressed by the favors you receive as I fear we never can return them- you speak rightly of your notes I tremble pray my love remember that he is your ancient friend. Yet your property is not yours alone your helpless children and their equally helpless mother look [2] to you for bread for cloathing and what is more your childrens education and setting out in life might be effected by that sum alone
I have letters by the two last packets from my sister. She expected about this time, to be a mother I wish she had not told me of it, my fears quite overcame me when I perused her letter, last evening, and in [struck: on] my dreams I thought her dead- god send I be not the only one remaining of our once happy family-
I have also a letter from Mrs Fluker with some sweet meats they both desire to to [sic] affectionately remembered to you, and Mrs Harwood says there is no doubt of the whole sum due from government being paid within six months.
I am with our good friends at Trenton, they are what they ever were we are a large family Mrs McKee being here with children Mrs [Hasomclover] and Gouverneur Morris, the latter has contributed to my amusement by beating him at chess, notwithstanding, his quick perception and clear head.
Adieu my best beloved take care of yourself and remember the equinox.
Yours most Sincerely
L. Knox

[address leaf]
Major general Knox
Boston

[docket]
From Mrs Knox
Recd in Portland
Harbour this 10th of Sept
1788

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