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Adams, John (1735-1826) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.05014 Author/Creator: Adams, John (1735-1826) Place Written: Braintree, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 19 June 1791 Pagination: 3 p. : address : docket ; 32 x 19.6 cm.

Summary of Content: Written by Vice President Adams to Secretary of War Knox. References Knox's letter of 10 June. Is happy Knox is pleased with his situation at Bush Hill. Hopes to hear soon "of the Birth of a peaceable son of Mars." Says he did not know about the paragraphs in the New York newspapers. Just heard of the "Lyes" from New Haven yesterday. Does not think the criticism originated with Roger Sherman or Ezra Stiles. Says "The Preface to [Thomas] Paines Nonsense has occasioned much Speculation. It is thought rather early for Electioneering. My head I thank God is not easily diverted from its Views nor my heart from its Resolutions; and therefore neither Paine nor his God father will much affect me." This is a reference to Thomas Jefferson. Mentions the cordial reception President Washington is getting on his tour. Says the present Indian campaign is "a just and a necessary war," and hopes the necessary forces can be collected. Expresses sadness over the death of Dr. Richard Price. Says three members of his family had the "Fever and Ague," but are better. Hopes to see him in October "by which time I hope our mutual Friend will get the better of his frenchified delirium." "Free" stamped on address leaf with no signature.

Full Transcript: Braintree June 19. 1791
Dear Sir
I had yesterday the Pleasure of receiving your kind Letter of the 10th of this month, and am happy to find that you are pleased with ...your Situation at Bush Hill. I hope soon to hear of the Birth of a peaceable son of Mars, and that Mrs Knox is as well and in as good Spirits as you [text loss: a]ppear to be.
The Paragraphs in the New York Pap[text loss: ers] I know nothing of: The Lyes in the New Haven one I never heard of till yesterday. one Thing I believe: it was not Roger Sherman, [inserted: nor Dr Stiles] who wrote them nor any Friend of theirs.
The Preface to Paines Nonsense has occasioned much Speculation. It is thought rather early for Electioneering. My head I thank God is not easily diverted from its Views nor my heart from its Resolutions; and therefore neither Paine nor [2] his God father will much affect me. an[text loss: d] I believe they will affect the Public as little. It only grieves me that a Character who stood high is so much lowered in the public Esteem.
The cordial and glorious reception of t[text loss] President in every part of his Tour, [text loss] an omen for good to the People, and gives universal Pleasure, in this part of the Country.
Although the Indian Campaign is an [text loss] yet the War I presume is a just and a necessary War, and therefore I rejoice that the Forces are so well collected and so far advanced.
The Arrival of Col Smith [text loss] happy Event for me and my Family an[text loss] We all thank you Sir for your ob[text loss] Congratulations on it.
The Death of my learned and amia[text loss] Friend Dr Price has hurt me more than little flickerings of Politicks. Although his Zeal for Liberty was not always deco[text loss] to Knowledge, his heart was always upr[text loss] and benevolent, and his Mind was open [text loss] Conviction. [3] Three of my Family brought with them the Fever and Ague, but are better. I hope to see you in October by which time I hope our mutual Friend will get the better of his frenchified delirium: meantime I am with great regard
your Friend and humble Servant
John Adams
General Knox
Secretary at War
[address leaf]
Henry Knox Esq.r
Secretary at War,
Philadelphia
[docket]
The Vice President
June 19, 1791
See More

People: Knox, Henry, 1750-1806
Adams, John, 1735-1826
Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826
Price, Richard, 1723-1791
Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809
Sherman, Roger, 1721-1793
Stiles, Ezra, 1727-1795

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: American Indian HistoryNorthwest Indian WarRevolutionary War GeneralPresidentVice PresidentClassical World and Ancient CivilizationChildren and FamilyJournalismPoliticsElectionTravelGovernment and CivicsLiterature and Language ArtsCorruption and ScandalMilitary HistoryRecruitmentNorthwest TerritoryWestward ExpansionFrench RevolutionFranceDiseaseHealth and MedicalDeathFrontiers and Exploration

Sub Era: The Early Republic

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