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Gibson, Randall Lee (1832-1892) [to his sister Louisiana Gibson]

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC04501.022 Author/Creator: Gibson, Randall Lee (1832-1892) Place Written: near New Dalton, Georgia Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 30 April 1864 Pagination: 8 p. ; 21 x 12.5 cm.

Randall writes to his sister once a week, hoping that one of his letters will break the blockade and make its way across the Atlantic. He also hopes that John Slidell will be able to secure the recognition of the French government. He includes news of family and friends and stresses the importance of learning to spell correctly. Kin (a nickname for his brother John McKinley Gibson) is now his aide de camp.

[excerpt]
[3]…I hope Mr Slidell may be able even yet to get the French Government to appreciate our Cause and to help us. I have no doubt but that he has secured the friendship of that Government for us - and I seriously believe that by the time this letter reaches you we shall be stronger, shall occupy more of the Country; maintain longer & better armies & afford such evidences of power and stability - that we cannot fail to receive the recognition of France. Thus you see I think great and even glorious victories are to be [4] this summer. And my hopes & convictions rest upon the most solid basis. I dont [sic] want the French to help us fight the Yankees - we can do our own fighting - but to recognize us - to do us the justice so readily accorded to other nations. Once recognized - a powerful peace party - would at once spring up at the North and the war would cease.

[excerpt]
[3]…I hope Mr Slidell may be able even yet to get the French Government to appreciate our Cause and to help us. I have no doubt but that he has secured the friendship of that Government for us - and I seriously believe that by the time this letter reaches you we shall be stronger, shall occupy more of the Country; maintain longer & better armies & afford such evidences of power and stability - that we cannot fail to receive the recognition of France. Thus you see I think great and even glorious victories are to be [4] this summer. And my hopes & convictions rest upon the most solid basis. I dont [sic] want the French to help us fight the Yankees - we can do our own fighting - but to recognize us - to do us the justice so readily accorded to other nations. Once recognized - a powerful peace party - would at once spring up at the North and the war would cease.

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