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Morgan, John Hunt (1825-1864) Proclamation. To the inhabitants of Kentucky!

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC04892 Author/Creator: Morgan, John Hunt (1825-1864) Place Written: Hartsville, Tennessee Type: Broadside Date: 22 August 1862 Pagination: 1 p ; 43 x 22.3 cm

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC04892 Author/Creator: Morgan, John Hunt (1825-1864) Place Written: Hartsville, Tennessee Type: Broadside Date: 22 August 1862 Pagination: 1 p ; 43 x 22.3 cm

Urging Kentuckians to join the Confederate cause, during his first raid into Kentucky. Proclaims: "Better death in our sacred cause, than a life of slavery! Young men of Kentucky flock to my standard, it will always wave in the path of honor, and history will relate how you responded to my appeal, and how, by so doing, you saved your country." Printed on a press Morgan had recently captured at Hartsville.

John Hunt Morgan was a Confederate brigadier general known for his raids into the North.

Fellow Countrymen - I HAVE KEPT MY PROMISE. At the head of my old companions in arms, I am once more amongst you, with God's blessing no more to leave you.
Deprived as you are by these Northern Despots of all true information respecting the War, you are probably unaware that our holy Southern Cause is everywhere in the ascendant.
The so-called "Young Napoleon," McClellan, has retreated from the Peninsula. Stonewall Jackson, the 'invincible,' is asserting the superiority of our Southern Banner against the armies of Pope, Banks, Fremont, Burnside and that of McClellan, who has joined them. His ultimate success is assured.
NO POWER ON EARTH CAN MAKE US SLAVES! Bragg, in Tennessee, is steadily advancing with a n overwhelming force on Buel, who is retreating, whilst New Orleans is on the eve of being torn from the clutches of "Butler, the infamous," and restored to its legitimate and Confederate Government.
Kirby Smith at the head of a powerful army, is already in your State, whilst Forrest, Woodward, and myself have already proven to the Yankees our existance by taking Murfreesboro, Gallatin and Clarksville, burning the railroad bridges and damaging seriously the enemy.
AROUSE KENTUCKIANS! shake off that listless feeling which was engendered by the presence of a powerful and relentless enemy. He is no longer to be feared! We have drawn his eye-teeth! There will soon be nothing left of him but his roar!
Let the old men of Kentucky, and our noblehearted women, arm their sons and their lovers for the fight! Better death in our sacred cause, than a life of slavery!
Young men of Kentucky flock to my standard, it will always wave in the path of honor, and history will relate how you responded to my appeal, and how, by so doing, you saved your country.

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