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Jefferson, Thomas (1743-1826) to Benjamin Rush re: Rush's son, "Philosophy of Jesus"

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07840 Author/Creator: Jefferson, Thomas (1743-1826) Place Written: Monticello Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 1804/08/08 Pagination: 1 p. + engraving 25.4 x 20.1 cm

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07840 Author/Creator: Jefferson, Thomas (1743-1826) Place Written: Monticello Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 1804/08/08 Pagination: 1 p. + engraving 25.4 x 20.1 cm

Background Information:

Full Transcript: Monticello Aug. 8. 04.
Dear Sir

Your favor of the 1st. inst. came to hand last night. the embarrassment of answering propositions for office negatively, and the inconveniencies which have sometimes arisen [...struck] from answering affirmatively, even when the affirmative is intended, has led to the general rule of leaving the answer to be read in the act of appointment or non-appointment whenever either is manifested. I depart from the rule however in the present case, that no injury may arise from that suspension of opinion which would be removed at once by a communication of the fact that there is no probability that Colo. Monroe will quit his present station at any time now under contemplation. The departure of a person as his secretary, not long since, at his particular request, proves he has no [struck] such intention [stuck] and certainly we do not wish it, as his services gives the most perfect satisfaction. We had begun by appointing secretaries of legation, for the purpose of giving young men opportunities of qualifying themselves for public service: but desirable & useful as this would have been, it's aptness to produce discord has obliged us to abandon it, & to leave the ministers to appoint their own private secretaries, whose dependence on their principal secures a compatibility of temper. I shall be happy to receive your pamphlet, as I am whatever comes from you. I have also a little volume, a mere & faithful compilation with I shall some of these days ask you to read as containing the exemplification of what I advanced in a former letter as to the excellence of the Philosophy of Jesus of Nazareth'. Accept affectionate salutations & assurances of esteem & respect.

Th: Jefferson



Dr. Rush
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People: Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: PresidentChildren and FamilyReligion

Sub Era: The Age of Jefferson & Madison

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