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Realf, Richard to Judge Duval

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07886 Author/Creator: Realf, Richard Place Written: Austin, Texas Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 1859/12/06 Pagination: 3 p. + env. 20.4 x 12.5 cm

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07886 Author/Creator: Realf, Richard Place Written: Austin, Texas Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 1859/12/06 Pagination: 3 p. + env. 20.4 x 12.5 cm

Summary of Content: Offering a confession for his participation in the Canada Convention of 1858 and presenting himself for punishment in response to his actions. Also elaborating on the reasons for his participation. In part: "Sir: I have the honor to announce to you that, for the reasons which follow, I am desirious of surrendering myself...to the Constitutional authorities of the United States, as being, by my admission in the presense of witnesses, guilty of participation in the Canada Convention of May, 1838, which, it is suppossed, gave rise to the recent Harper's Ferry Insurrection....[My reasons are] First: Because I am desirous of proving the sincerity of my present views in regard to Slavery. Secondly: Because, if my past error entails upon the present punishment, I should like it to follow speedily; in order that the tenor of my speech and action might serve as a corrective of the influences engendered in the Northern States by the stoical principles [?] of John Brown.....Fourthly, because the surrender which I now make, will at least afford me the opportunity of doing some good in the way of embattling, by my testimony, the prejudices of the North against the Institutions of the South..."

People: Brown, John, 1800-1859

Historical Era: National Expansion and Reform, 1815-1860

Subjects: John BrownSlaveryAfrican American HistoryAbolitionCanadaGuerrilla WarfareSlave Rebellion

Sub Era: Age of Jackson

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