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Garfield, James A. (James Abram) (1831-1881) to Isaac Errett

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC08959 Author/Creator: Garfield, James A. (James Abram) (1831-1881) Place Written: Washington, D.C. Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 15 February 1866 Pagination: 2 p. ; 25 x 20 cm.

Believes that continued war, and not the recent peace, is the best course of action in regard to the South. "I am more convinced every month, that no truce can be made with the spirit of rebellion, that to fight it to the death is the only way to conquer it or even to secure its respect. Rebels never respected us so much as in battle & never despise us so much as when we attempt to conciliate." Offers to contribute an article to the Chirstian Standard. Both men helped found this newspaper, which was attached to the missionary religious order the Desciples of Christ, and Errett was its publisher. Letter addressed to Bro. Emett. Mounted on paper 27 x 22 cm.

Isaac Errett was a Christian missionary, preacher and publisher.

Dear Bro. Errett, Your favor from Louisville came duly to hand, and but for my great press of work would have been answered long ago. I am more convinced every month that no truce can be made of the spirit of rebellion; that to fight it to the death is the only way to conquer it or even to decrease its respect. Rebels never respected us so much as in battle & never despise us as much as when we attempt to conciliate. It would be a clamity to the paper to have the support of the mass of Ky. Disciples. I hope it will handle them with all the courteous severity of truth. When will the first number be published, and when do you (sic) the articles for it? If I can possibly get the time I will send you an article on the "Christian Element in Government". I wish you would tell me what range you intend to take politically - in the paper. Your prospectus is most admirable. I would have a word added or subtracted. My wife sends love to you & yours - I send you my late speech. Ever your Brother, J. A. Garfield.

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