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Freeman, J. (fl. 1789) to George Thatcher

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC09374 Author/Creator: Freeman, J. (fl. 1789) Place Written: s.l. Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 22 June 1789 Pagination: 2 p.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC09374 Author/Creator: Freeman, J. (fl. 1789) Place Written: s.l. Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 22 June 1789 Pagination: 2 p.

Summary of Content: To George Thatcher, Massachusetts delegate to the Continental Congress, re news from House of Representatives in Boston, titles being discussed for George Washington: "Brother Davis … followed my advice in appearing very modest the first session. John Gardiner has harangued several times with great effect. I fear that, by talking too much and too vehemently, he will soon lose his influence… I am happy to find that your sentiments on title are the same as my own. The zeal which some manifest for them is truly ridiculous. The people in this town, and especially the women, think that no style can be too elevated for General Washington. This is in particular the opinion of my wife, with whom I have had several quarrels upon the subject. Some propose that he should be called His Highness, other His Supremacy, and other His Sublimity; and I have seen an honest federalist this morning who conceives that no title is more suitable than that of the Most High."

People:

Historical Era: Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1900

Subjects: FederalistsPresidentsContinental CongressWomen's HistoryPolitics

Sub Era: The Early Republic

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