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Hartke, Vance, (1919-2003) Congressional Record Proceedings and Debates of the 90th Congress, First Session.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC09787.04 Author/Creator: Hartke, Vance, (1919-2003) Place Written: Washington, D.C. Type: Newsletter Date: 20 April 1967 Pagination: 2 p. ; 27.6 x 20.2 cm.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC09787.04 Author/Creator: Hartke, Vance, (1919-2003) Place Written: Washington, D.C. Type: Newsletter Date: 20 April 1967 Pagination: 2 p. ; 27.6 x 20.2 cm.

Summary of Content: One issue of "Congressional Record" dated April 20, 1966 related to crime. Hartke requests permission for the record to print excerpts of a report by the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice called, "What Citizen's and Their Organizations Can Do." This report details what ten groups can do about preventing crime. The first group mentioned is the individual, who can report a crime using a hotline number, and useing locks on doors and windows to ensure safety. Also they can make sure to not leave their keys in the ignition of their cars. The second group mentioned is Industry, Religious Institutions, and other Private Groups. The report cites groups like the YMCA (Young Man's Christian Association) and their "detached worker" program and church groups in St. Louis and Chicago that have opened the first halfway houses for released prisoners. The third group mentioned is Business, Industry, and Labor Unions. One example is the auto industry implementing ignitions that buzz when keys are left in place, or locks around the steering column to prevent cars form moving unless the key is in the ignition. The other suggestion is work release programs for convicted criminals that teach a skill and provide a job once their sentence is over. The fourth group mentioned was Private Agencies, and Foundations, which contributes with experimental programs which private groups can be more flexible with. The fifth group is Religious institutions, which help with education, and community outreach. The sixth group is for Community and Professional Organizations, which highlights the Anti Crime Crusade group from Indianapolis. A group of 50,000 women in 14 divisions who have made major leaps in crime prevention. The final group suggested is that of Colleges and Universities, which can help by teaching modern methods of law enforcement to future lawyers. They can also conduct studies on results of various programs, to greatly refine future plans. In conclusion the report states there is no easy answer to crime. It can only be combated by time money and effort.

Background Information:

People: Hartke, Vance, 1919-2003

Historical Era: 1945 to the Present

Subjects: Charity and PhilanthropyCivilian ResponsibilityCrimePhilanthropistsUnions

Sub Era: The Sixties

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