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Knox, Henry (1750-1806) to John Lamb

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.01483 Author/Creator: Knox, Henry (1750-1806) Place Written: New Windsor, New York Type: Manuscript letter Date: 11 July 1782 Pagination: 3 p. : docket ; 20.7 x 16.8 cm.

Written by and signed for Knox by Samuel Shaw. Says he would have thought Washington would have ordered Lamb's unit to march by now. Says he just heard from Washington that he will not be giving any orders until he returns from Philadelphia. Washington was leaving for that city this morning to meet with Rochambeau. Assumes Lamb will not be ordered to move until the end of this month or the beginning of the next. Wants his troops to stay employed on the wagons and tumbrils, as the Secretary of War has informed him there are no funds for those items. Reports that "Lt. Fink of your regiment has been guilty of such unbecoming practices, that it has been necessary for Captn. Moore to arrest him, for repeated drunkenness and abusing some persons at West Point. The proofs are so direct, that there is no doubt but that he would on trial be broke with infamy." As a result there was an effort to get Fink to resign, which was done with Washington's approval. Moore was put in charge of the regimental and public accounts.

[draft]
New Windsor,
Dear Colonel, 11 July 1782.

I was in hopes that by the time his Excellency General Washington would have decided that the corps under your compound should [begin] their march. But on my application to him this day, he informed that he thought it would be best to suspend giving any orders until his return from Philadelphia, to which place he sets off in the morning to meet General Rochambeau. I presume from what he said that it will be the latter end of this month, or the begining of next before you will move. In the mean time you will please to keep the artificers steadily employed on the wagons and tumbrills, as those we shall make will [2] will be all our dependence. The Minister of War intimated that the public funds were so ill applied as to put it entirely out of his power to contract for any.
Lt. [Fink] of your regiment has been guilty of unbecoming practices, that it has been necessary for Capt. Moodie to arrest him for repeated drunkenness and abusing some persons at West Point. The proofs are so direct, that there is no doubt but that he would on trial be broke with infamy. This has induced Capt. Moodie, to save the disgrace that must necessarily ensue, to endeavor through one to obtain him leave to resign, which his Excellency has granted, on condition that Capt. Moodie becomes responsible for his regimental and public accounts. The [3] The Captain readily complied with a proposal which indeed originated with himself. I hope this procedure will meet with your approbation.
Please to present my love to Col. Stevens, Bauman, Doughty, and the gentlemen with you.
I am,
Dear Colonel,
affectionately your
huml Servt.
HKnox.

Col. Lamb.

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