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Knox, Henry (1750-1806) to Marquis de Lafayette

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.02830 Author/Creator: Knox, Henry (1750-1806) Place Written: New York, New York Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 14 December 1783 Pagination: 3 p. : docket ; 19.7 x 16.2 cm.

Summary of Content: Says he wrote Lafayette "several letters" expressing his affection for him. Says America as a nation believes the same thing and that "you must not regard [such expressions] as compliments but the language of sincerity." Goes on to say "Our independence is now established and we feel the warmest gratitude to all the means what have contributed to effect it." Reports that "The English have at last left us to ourselves, with the full expectation that we shall not know how to govern the ship of state and that we must apply to the Steady and well experienced pilots of Britain." Says "Our much loved friend the General has gone from this city to Congress and from thence to Mount Vernon." Goes on to praise Washington. Sending this note by the Chevalier Villefranche.

Full Transcript: [draft]
New York 14 Decr 1783

I have written to you my dear Marquis several times expressing [struck: of] my affection for you, and informing [struck: you] how dear you were to ...America in general. These [inserted: sentiments] you must not regard [struck: in the light] as compliments but the language [struck: of a grateful] sincerity. Our independence is now established and we feel the warmest gratitude to [inserted: all] the means which have contributed to effect it.
We have been flattered in the hope of your visiting of us again, but [struck: hitherto] in this we have not yet been gratified, but in pursuance of the Spirit which [2] accompanied us through the War, we shall hope. [struck: on] -
Our [struck: old friends] [inserted: inmates] The English have at
last left us to ourselves, with the full expectation that we shall not know how to govern the [ship] of state, [struck: but] [inserted: and] that we must apply to the steady and well experienced pilots of Britain [struck: for pilots] - Time which matures all things will explain this matter.
Our much loved friend the General has gone from this city to [struck: Mount V.] Congress, and from thence to Mount Vernon, attended with the [strikeout] [inserted: entire] blessing of his Country - how exquisitely rich are his feelings! - Conscious of having done well [3] and at the same time to have [inserted: his conduct] [struck: it acknowledged] universally [inserted: appauded is a rare felicity -] [struck: This is not always the case & therefore the more happy the present instance]
I write this note by the Chevalier Villefranche, who is [struck: accompanied] going with Major Rochefontaine to France - They both are Men of merit, and deserve the protection of [struck: the] [inserted: all] good men - [struck: That strikeout] [inserted and struck: [the] Colonel] [struck: Villefranche has been much with me] [inserted: Therefore I am certain of the much] receiving your countenance -
I am my dear Marquis
with much affection your sincere friend
and humble Sevt
HKnox
The Marquis de la Fayette
[docket]
To the Marquis de la Fayette
1783 -
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Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: Revolutionary WarRevolutionary War GeneralMilitary HistoryContinental ArmyImmigration and MigrationFranceGlobal History and US Foreign PolicyGlobal History and US Foreign PolicyFreedom and IndependenceGovernment and CivicsMount VernonContinental CongressCongressPresident

Sub Era: Creating a New Government

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