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Van Schaick, Goose (1736-1789) Rules and articles for the better government of the troops raised, or to be raised and kept in pay by and at the expence of the United States of America.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC04050 Author/Creator: Van Schaick, Goose (1736-1789) Place Written: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Type: Pamphlet signed Date: 1776 Pagination: 1 v. : 36 p. ; 22.1 x 13.7 cm.

Summary of Content: Created by the Continental Congress and printed by John Dunlap. Signed by Colonel Goose Van Schaick in 1777. Contains uniform regulations for commissioned and noncommissioned officers, relates penalties and reasons for the issue of Court Martials. Discusses seditious activity, the organization and assembly of raised troops, penalties for false returns, the liberty to bring provisions into forts, and various other topics. Issued by order of Congress, presided over by John Hancock, 20 September 1776. The back cover states "Articles of War, Col. GV Schaick."

Full Transcript: Section VII. Art. 2. No officer or solider shall presume to send a challenge to any other officer or soldier, to fight a duel, upon pain, if a commissioned officer, of ...being cashiered, if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, of suffering corporal punishment, at the direction of a Court-Martial. [11] ...
Section VIII. Art. 2. All officers, soldiers and suttlers, shall have full liberty to bring into any of the forts or garrisons of the United American States, any quantity or species of provisions, eatable or drinkable, except where any contract or contracts are or shall be entered into by Congress, or by their order, for furnishing such provisions, and with respect only to the species of provisions so contracted for. [13]...
Section IX. Art 1. Every officer commanding in quarters, garrisons, or on a march, shall keep good order, and to the utmost of his power redress all such abuses or disorders which may be committed by any officer or soldier under his command; if upon complaint made to him of officers or soldiers beating or otherwise ill treating any person; or disturbing fairs or markets, or of committing any kind of riots to the disquieting of the good people of the United States; he the said Commander, who shall refuse or omit to see justice done on the offender or offender's pay shall enable him or them, shall upon proof thereof be punished by a General Court-Martial as if he himself had committed the crimes or disorders complained of. [14] ...
Section XI. Art. 1 If any officer shall think himself to be wronged by his Colonel or the Commanding Officer of the regiment, and shall upon due application made to him, be refused to be redressed, he may complain to the General, commanding in chief the forces of the United States, in order to obtain justice, who is hereby required to examine into the said complaint, and either by himself or the Board of War, to make report to Congress thereupon, in order to receive further directions. [15] ...
Section XIII. Art. 6. Whatever centinel shall be found sleeping upon his post, or shall leave it before he shall be regularly relieved, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be inflicted by sentence of a Court-Martial. [19] ...
Art. 14. Any person belonging to the forces of the United States, who shall cast away his arms and ammunition, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general Court-Martial. [21] ...
Section XIV. Art. 16. No officer or soldier who shall be put in arrest or imprisonment, shall continue in his confinement more than eight days, or till such time as a Court-martial can be conveniently assembled. [29] ...
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People: Van Schaick, Goose, 1736-1789
Dunlap, John, 1747-1812
Hancock, John, 1737-1793

Historical Era: American Revolution, 1763-1783

Subjects: CongressContinental CongressMilitary HistoryRevolutionary WarMilitary LawContinental ArmyMutinyRecruitmentMuster Rolls and ReturnsMilitary SuppliesMilitary Provisions

Sub Era: The War for Independence

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