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Franklin, Benjamin (1706-1790) Pennsylvania gazette. [Nos. 42-315] [Incomplete]

NOT AVAILABLE DIGITALLY Online access and copy requests are not available for this item. If you would like us to notify you when it becomes available digitally, please email us at reference@gilderlehrman.org and include the catalog item number.

Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC03438 Author/Creator: Franklin, Benjamin (1706-1790) Place Written: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Type: Newspaper Date: 1729 - 1734 Pagination: 1 v. ; 870 p. ; 31 x 20 cm.

Summary of Content: Samuel Kaimer began publishing the Gazette on Dec. 24, 1728 and sold the paper to Franklin and Meredith in 1729 with issue no. 40. The partnership dissolved as early as 7/14/1730 although Meredith's name was kept on the colophon through 5/4/1732; Franklin's name appears alone beginning with issue no. 180 (5/11/1732). 223 issues Volume includes issues: 42-52, 55, 57-61, 63-64, 66-67, 73, 76, 78, 80-94, 97-99, 102-107, 109-118, 120-136, 138, 141-149, 151-159, 161-166, 168-172, 174-192, 194-195, 197-198, 202, 212-215, 217-223, 225-236, 238-241, 243-251, 253-259, 261-307, 309 and 313-315 (Oct. 9 1729- Dec. 12 1734). Volume LACKS: 53-54, 56, 62, 65, 68-72, 74-75, 77, 79, 95-96, 100-101, 108, 119, 137, 139-140, 150, 160, 167, 173, 193, 196, 199-201, 203-211, 216, 224, 237, 242, 252, 260, 308 and 310-312. "Mr. Jones" appears written on the tops of issue nos. 61, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68 and 73. Not paginated. Pages per issue are usually four, except for nos. 43-52 and 55.

Background Information: Continues "The Universal instructor in all arts and sciences, and Pennsylvania gazette." Issues have a subtitle, "Containing the freshest advices, foreign and domestick." Suspended publication at Philadelphia with the issue ...of Sept. 10, 1777, upon the arrival of the British troops. Published at York, Pa., Dec. 20, 1777-June 20, 1778. Continued by "The Pennsylvania gazette, and weekly advertiser," published in Philadelphia, starting with the issue of Jan. 5, 1779. Published by Benjamin Franklin and Hugh Meredith, 2 October 1729. Benjamin Franklin 11 May 1732. Benjamin Franklin and David Hall, 12 January 1748. No name given 21 November 1765. David Hall, 6 February 1766. David Hall and William Sellers, 8 May 1766. William and David Hall and William Sellers, 30 December 1772.See More

Full Transcript: Includes international news from various overseas sources, as well as domestic news and classified ads. Subjects include colonial and Indian affairs, European and Parliamentary news, commercial notices, and acts of ...Assemblies. By around 1732, news of murders and other heinous crimes are explained in great detail. Each issue reports news from personal letters and merchants. "Mr. Jones" appears written on the tops of issues 63, 64, 66, 67 and 73.


9 to 16 October 1729 No. 42 4 p.
· Article discussing merits of hemp as compared to linen/flax, at the request of subscribers. Chambers' Universal Dictionary is credited with information. Discusses side effects resulting from indulgence of the plant, whether inhaling its smoke or ingesting powder mixed with alcohol (not recommended). Describes cannabis' physical characteristics relating to textiles and discusses its medicinal qualities: mixed with milk to cure jaundice, ingesting seeds to "abate venereal diseases." Includes directions on manufacturing hemp from a fresh plant.
· Letter from Boston's new governor, W. Dummer, discussing his appointment and plans for the future. Response from the House of Representatives.
· Earthquake in Florence.
Fiddler's wife drowns after canoe overturns due to his preoccupation in saving his fiddle

16 to 23 October 1729 No. 43 2 p.
· Favorable note regarding future of the paper, especially securing foreign correspondents. Starting on Monday (27 October) half sheets will be published twice weekly in order to make more frequent the public's "entertainment."
· Plague epidemic in Smyrna and Alexandria (news from Florence).
Note on Pennsylvania governor's trip from Philadelphia to Newcastle (Pa.) to meet Assembly.

23 to 27 October 1729 No. 44 2 p.
· Note on Pennsylvania governor's trip from Philadelphia to Newcastle (Pa.) to meet Assembly of Three Lower Counties (Kent, New-Castle, and Sussex). Includes Governor Patrick Gordon's speech about his administration having gotten off to a rough start, being optimistic for future, and problem of lack of uniform currency in Pennsylvania. Note: Gordon was "Governor of Pennsylvania and Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex upon Delaware."

27 to 30 October 1729 No. 45 2 p.
· Address of representatives in General Assembly in response to Governor Gordon's speech discussing the gravity of currency situation. Assembly hopes the governor treats counties' issues and problems with as much importance as those of the province (of Pennsylvania). Includes governor's reply.
Announces return of governor.

30 October to 3 November 1729 No. 46 2 p.
· Death of Grand Seignior and accession of his son to throne in Constantinople.
· Pope has won over the poor by abolishing taxes on leather for shoes and soap.
Reports murder of pregnant woman and capture of her murderer in Edinburgh.

3 to 6 November 1729 No. 47 2 p.
· Act of Parliament passed protecting American forests.
· Letter from Jeremiah Dummer contrasting the late governor of Massachusetts, W. Dummer, and the people.
Note that foreign news will be in Monday's paper.

6 to 10 November 1729 No. 48 2 p.
Grave illness of King of Poland and issues surrounding his almost certain death.

10 to 13 November 1729 No. 49 2 p.
· King of Poland unable to carryout his royal duties.
· List of imports/exports of New-York Custom-House
Short news about court cases.

13 to 17 November 1729 No. 50 2 p.
· Letter from late King George I to King of Spain regarding restitution of Gibraltar.

17 to 20 November 1729 No. 51 2 p.
· Issue focuses on "Affairs of Ireland." Discusses unhappiness of the Irish stemming from poverty, famine, unemployment, and taxes.

20 to 24 November 1729 No. 52 2 p.
· Enquiry into State of the Gaols in England (to be continued).
· Report of a Mr. Cowel's aloe plant's blossoming.

1 to 4 December 1729 No. 55 2 p.
· Continuation of Enquiry into the State of the Goals in England.

9 to 16 December 1729 No. 57 4 p.
· Letter to the editor submitting a piece of satire on the Tribe of Commentators, Expositors, Annotators, Criticks, etc.
· Report from the Committee appointed to the Enquiry into the State of the Goals discussing British prisons: namely misappropriated charity funds, the criminality of William Acton, Clerk of Marshalsea prison, and the careless oversight of his boss, John Darby, Keeper of Marshalsea prison.

16 to 23 December 1729 No. 58 4 p.
· News from Ispahan (Kingdom of Persia) discussing the terrible conditions: starvation, poverty, war.
· Letter from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen of London welcoming the King and congratulating him on his safe return to the city. King's thanks included.
· Death of Sir Richard Steel, Knight Master if the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane.

23 to 30 December 1729 No. 59 4 p.
· Essay/obituary in memory of Sir Richard Steele., "a benefactor to the human species."
· Note from King Louis XV announcing the birth of his son, Louis (4 September 1729). Note: Louis the dauphin died in 1765, nine years before his father, having never become king. His son, Louis, became King Louis XVI.
· News of parties celebrating the birth of the dauphin.




30 December to 6 January 1730 No. 60 4 p.
· Announcement that beginning at the end of January, the Gazette will include an insert of amusing and entertaining stories. Submissions are requested.
· King of Sardinia has closed the Jesuit, Carmelite, Barnabite, and Fathers of the Oratory colleges and has forbid the education of children by the clergy.
· Report of a fiery tornado ravaging the Meadows of Massa.
· Obituary of a midwife, aged "one hundred years and a day."

6 to 13 January 1730 No. 61 4 p.
· Poem to Samuel Hastings, shipwright of Philadelphia, on the launching of his big ship, the Maryland. Originally published in the Maryland Gazette, 30 December 1729.
· News from Paris: Castle of Cournicillon has been burnt to the ground by lightning, nothing having been rescued but the papers, award from the Academy of Science at Bordeaux of 300 livres to the person who can explain the "Cause of Winds, and their Variations."

20 to 27 January 1730 No. 63 4 p.
· "Mr. Jones" written in cursive above the title.
· Governor Gordon addresses the Assembly and assures them of his good intentions, especially regarding the paper currency act that he is still lobbying for "at home" (England). Includes assembly's response that they are glad to hear the governor has not forgotten them, but are disheartened that there has been no news from England.
· Letter from King Louis XV to the Archbishop of Paris regarding the birth of his son.
· News surrounding the birth of Louis.
· From London, news of a man who drunk himself to death while participating in a drinking contest. His opponent is "so dangerously ill that it is thought he cannot recover."

27 January to 3 February 1730 No. 64 4 p.
· "Mr. Jones" written in cursive above the title.
· King of Sardinia will build an academy in Turin and will send for instructors from throughout Europe. Has forbid all subjects "to take for the future the Habit of Religion" and to explain "the real Motives that have induced them to lead a Monastick Life."
· Singers are hired by Mr. George F. Handel for the Opera. Names are listed. Note: Introduces new opera soloist, Anna Maria Strada del Pò (soprano), at a performance before the royal family (10 October 1729). Signora Strada is mentioned in the news article. For more chronological information, see http://gfhandel.org.




10 to 19 February 1730 No. 66 4 p.
· "Mr. Jones" written in cursive above the title.
· Related by the King's interpreter from the original Arabic, as told to him by Cossum Aga, the late Envoy from the Regency of Tripoly, a story about a petrified city and its inhabitants.
· A London Exchange broker, Nathaniel Bostock, having been reported murdered, was discovered in hiding after sending 4 East India Bonds.
· Charge of counterfeit money.

19 to 24 February 1730 No. 67 4 p.
· "Mr. Jones" written in cursive above the title.
· After accidentally swallowing a wasp in a glass of wine, a man died from the stings in his throat after coughing it up.
· News of the gruesome torture of a prisoner by Shawana Indians.

2 to 9 April 1730 No. 73 4 p.
· "Mr. Jones" written in cursive above the title.
· Letter discussing the merits of the Pennsylvania Gazettes' request for writers and submissions. Author offers guidelines for choosing articles. Essay preceded by a quote, in Latin, by Pliny. Signed, "No. 1 The Plain Dealer."
· Discussion of the aloe plant formerly mentioned (see 20 to 24 November 1729, No. 52)
· Poem "On the Death of Mr. Austin Paris."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Passing of the paper currency Act for the lower counties upon Delaware. Includes the signers' names.

23 to 30 April 1730 No. 76 4 p.
· "The Plain-Dealer. No. 3" begins his essay with a Latin quote by Cicero. Essayist hopes the article will "incline their [the readers'] Hearts to a Love of Truth and Sincerity…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Philip Cortland appointed one of his Majesty's Council in the province of New-York
· Repeated: Passing of the paper currency Act for the lower counties upon Delaware. Includes the signers' names.

7 to 14 May 1730 No. 78 4 p.
· "The Plain-Dealer. No. 4" begins with a quote in English by Dryd. Juv. This installment discusses the improvement of the "fair-sex" through education as that "will make them lovely, when the Charms of their Faces lie buried in Wrinkles."
· Speech by John Montgomerie, Colonial Governor of New-York and New-Jersey to the General Assembly of that province assuring them that the prosperity of NJ is close to his heart. Sees this as an opportunity for residents of NJ to show their loyalty to the king, especially by paying taxes.
· Spread of smallpox.
· Epidemic of Buggs (lice) and a physician's remedy to rid beds and furniture of them.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

21 to 28 May 1730 No. 80 4 p.
· Information about smallpox inoculation taken from Chambers' Dictionary. Mentions the spread of smallpox in the neighboring province (NY? NJ?).
· The Archbishop of Canterbury is near death.
· Act directed at the governors in America regarding whaling. Signed by James Vernon at the Court of St. James.
· Address by the House of Representatives of NJ to Governor Montgomerie (Signed by speaker John Kinsey) thanking the governor for all his hard work on their behalf (namely the currency issue).
· Montgomerie's response: assures them of his and the king's best intentions.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

28 May to 4 June 1730 No. 81 4 p.
· "The Plain-Dealer. No. 6" begins with a quote in Latin by Horace. This installment discusses the various merits and characteristics of poets/poetry and painters/painting. Includes a poem.
· Letter to the King George II from King Louis XV, signed Chauvelin. Discusses Louis's loyalty to George.
· Address of George II to the House of Commons in response to the Dunkirk issue. Note: The king was to send a ship to Dunkirk to assess the present situation.

4 to 11 June 1730 No. 82 4 p.
· "The Plain-Dealer. No. 7" begins with a quote in Latin by "Cicer. De Nat. Deor." This installment discusses religion and its three great adversaries: atheism, superstition, and enthusiasm.
· Movement of 6000 Spanish troops into Italy where they plan on invading the towns of Tuscany and Parma.
· Smallpox epidemic in Boston is proving more fatal than expected. Of the 510 people inoculated, only 11 are dead.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

11 to 18 June 1730 No. 83 4 p.
· "The Plain-Dealer. No. 8" begins with a quote in Latin "Omnibus dormio" ("We all sleep"). This installment discusses sleep and a recent dream.
· Poem dedicated to Caleb D'Anvers, Esq. "On the Treaty lately concluded at Seville."
· Note that no one was buried in the past week.


18 to 23 June 1730 No. 84 4 p.
· "A Dialogue between Philocles and Horatio, meeting accidentally in the fields, concerning Virtue and Pleasure."
· News of the Russian Czar's courtship and marriage to Princess Katherine, Prince Dolhorucki's eldest daughter, just weeks before his death.
· News of grave robbers in Cambridge.

25 June to 2 July 1730 No. 85 4 p.
· "The Plain-Dealer. No. 9" begins with a quote in Latin by Pers. This installment mentions "epistolary discourse" (readership feedback) regarding the Plain-Dealer's last 2 lectures on "philosophical doubting." Letter's author expounds upon the subject in his own opinion. Note to the public explains that the 9 Plain-Dealer lectures were originally published in the Maryland Gazette.
· Coronation of the Czarina Katherine of Russia.
· Con-artist discovered in Charlestown.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

2 to 9 July 1730 No. 86 4 p. (Burn on pages 1/2)
· "A Second Dialogue between Philocles and Horatio, meeting accidentally in the fields, concerning Virtue and Pleasure."
· Monument in honor of Sir Godfrey Kneller to be competed in Westminster Abbey. Its inscription is published.
· Announcement of graduation at Cambridge (Boston).

9 to 16 July 1730 No. 87 4 p.
· "An Essay On Original Primitive Christianity" from the London Journal, signed Socrates.
· Death of Lady Walgrave, daughter of King James II.
· Memorial to Samuel Clarke, DD, rector of St. James' Westminster. Include a poem.
· Passing of bills in Parliament regarding sitting pensioners in the House.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

16 to 23 July 1730 No. 88 4 p.
· "A Second Essay On Original Primitive Christianity" from the London Journal, signed Socrates.
· Pope Benedict XIII died. Discusses the events surrounding his death. Note: Mentions the Cardinal Alessandro Albini was made one of the superintendents responsible for administering the conclave. GLC00496.121 is a passport for Cardinal Albani.
· Speech of William Tailer, Governor and Commander in Chief of Massachusetts Bay province, to the Assembly regarding a newly appointed royal lieutenant governor, Jonathan Belcher, and the possibility of a visit from King George II.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries

23 to 30 July 1730 No. 89 4 p.
· "A Third Essay On Original Primitive Christianity" from the London Journal, signed Socrates. Note from the editor reporting the negative feedback generated by the essays ("sundry false, heretical and pernicious positions and opinions") and invites the detractors to write a rebuttal to set the record straight.
· King's speech to Parliament regarding its good work and support. The Lord Chancellor then called the session to a close until the following July.

30 July to 6 August 1730 No. 90 4 p.
· Smallpox epidemic in Boston has ceased.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

6 to 13 August 1730 No. 91 4 p.
· The new Empress of Russia signed articles promising to consult with the Supreme Council regarding all matters having to do with the throne. Shortly after being elected sovereign (Katherine died), the Czarina Anne dismissed the Council and cancelled the restricting articles. She then dispatched 30,000 troops to help the Romans.
· Congratulatory poem for Jonathan Belcher, appointed to the government of New-England.
· Letter from the King of Spain "to the Vice-Roys, Governors, and Royal Officers ordering them to restore to the English Nation the Prizes which have been taken since the Notification of the Suspension of Arms."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

13 to 20 August 1730 No. 92 4 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

20 to 27 August 1730 No. 93 4 p.
· Letter from the Anne, the Czarina of Russia, explaining why she banished the Dolgorucki Princes, and the Ministers of Peter II.
· Cardinal Conti, brother of Pope Innocent XIII, died of a seizure.
· "Professor Boerhaave and Osterdyke's Regiments prescribed for the Gout."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

27 August to 3 September 1730 No. 94 4 p.
· Coronation of the Russian Czarina.
· Two letters from Surveyor General David Dunbar regarding "the new settlements to the Eastward."
· Speech from Gov. Montgomerie to the General Assembly of New-York informing them that the king has "disallowed all the acts you have passed, prohibiting the selling of Indian goods to the French, or laying duties on them…" Also discusses the Indian trade.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

17 to 24 September 1730 No. 97 4 p.
· Poem entitled "The Fright."
· Report of a mountain in the country of Cadorino split and engulfed a small village.
· Fable entitled "The Rats and the Cheese."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

24 September to 1 October 1730 No. 98 4 p.
· Speech of Gov. Jonathan Belcher of Massachusetts Bay province to the Assembly regarding his safe return to America, the passing of laws against immorality and impurity, religious toleration, administration of the colony. Assembly concurs.
· News from Rome regarding the election for Pope. Cardinals Barberini and Borghese are mentioned.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

1 to 8 October 1730 No. 99 4 p.
· Quote, in Latin, by Horace. Essay on the State of Matrimony, "Rules and Maxims for promoting Matrimonial Happiness. Addressed to all Widows, Wives, and Spinsters."
· "Extract from the Votes of the House of Representatives" in Massachusetts Bay province. Discusses the late Governor's (William Burnett) wishes concerning the administration of the province.
· Thomas Griffits elected mayor of Philadelphia. Newly elected officials listed.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

22 to 29 October 1730 No. 102 4 p.
· Speech by Patrick Gordon, Pa. Gov., to the Assembly at New-Castle regarding a "mutual Harmony, which will ever be the happy Result of a Disposition in those concerned in the Affairs of Our Government…" Assembly concurs.
· Speech by Jonathan Belcher, Ma. Gov., to the Assembly discussing his salary and the assembly's disregard for the king's wishes. Demands the assembly to "convince the King of the Duty and Loyalty you so much profess to him, and as you would approve your Love and Care for your Country…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

29 October to 5 November 1730 No. 103 4 p.
· Reprinting of the "Spectator No. 185" (originally published in 1711) at the request of subscribers. Includes 2 Latin quotes by Virgil and Ovid. Discusses the deception of zeal and passion.
· Message from Gov. Belcher of Ma. to the House of Representatives chastising the House for disregarding his last speech. Thinks that the House is trying to take the control of the people away from the King, which is where the people should be investing their loyalties. "…(Gentlemen) I have good reason to believe you principals (I mean the several towns you represent) are more than ever inclined to live in duty and obedience to the King, and to free themselves from the charge you are so constantly bringing upon them in this affair, and be in peace and quiet with one another."
· Rebellious poem published that was found outside the Council Chamber door in response to the governor's message.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

5 to 12 November 1730 No. 104 4 p.
· Piece discussing why swearing is passé and how the practice starts.
· Wolves have been ravaging the French countryside devouring people, making travel very unpleasant.
· Cardinal Corsini was elected Pope Clement XII, after a 4 month conclave.
· Aurora Borealis sighted in Newport, RI, and Boston.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

12 to 19 November 1730 No. 105 4 p.
· Article discussing business ethics.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

19 to 26 November 1730 No. 106 4 p.
· "The Spectator, NO. 209" describing "humane nature in a variety of views, and …the several ages of the world in their different manners."
· Don Manuel, Prince of Portugal, is on his way to Russia to wed Princess Proscovia Ivanovna, the "presumptive heir to the throne after the death of her eldest sister, the present Czarina…"
· Sig. Piero Altieri presented an Arabic-speaking parrot to Pope Clement XII. Altieri prohibited the bird from speaking Arabic and taught it to say the Christian Creed in Latin. After repeating the prayer to the Pope, Clement replied, "I doubt there are great numbers who call themselves Christians, that understand their Faith no better than this parrot."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

26 November to 3 December 1730 No. 107 4 p.
· Two letters to the editor regarding the article about business ethics (12 to 19 November 1730, No. 105).
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Notice informing readership that for the next three winter months, the Gazette will only be a half-sheet.

8 to 15 December 1730 No. 109 2 p.
· Issue number in Arabic numerals.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.


15 to 22 December 1730 No. 110 2 p.
· Report of a brohontomy ("opening a hole in the windpipe) to save a man's life. The patient was suffering from inflamed glands.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

22 to 29 December 1730 No. 111 2 p.
· Story of a man (a Sow-Gelder by profession) who offered to "spay" his friends' wives after spaying his own. After tinkering inside his wife, he was surprised to find the internal differences between a woman and a pig. His wife pled for his pardon at his trial.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

29 December 1730 to 5 January 1731 No. 112 2 p.
· Page dedicated to the statistics of vessels coming in and out of the ports of Philadelphia, Amboy, New-York, Rhode-Island, Boston, Salem, and New-Hampshire.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

5 to 12 January 1731 No. 113 2 p.
· Speech by Gov. Patrick Gordon of Pa. to the assembly resembling a state of the state address. Assembly agrees that the province has enjoyed good luck in peace and prosperity.

12 to 19 January 1731 No. 114 2 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Odd story of an incestuous marriage in France.

19 to 26 January 1731 No. 115 4 p.
· Poem entitled "The Thresher's Labor" by Stephen Duck.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Highlights of Gov. Belcher's (Ma.) speech. Discusses the matter of his salary, of which the bill "was so ambiguous and uncertain, that he is sure they had no Expectation of his consent to it…" Notice opines that the people of Massachusetts will be sorry for their obstinacy once the king hears about this.

26 January to 2 February 1731 No. 116 2 p.
· General news
· Poem entitled "On Poverty" by Stephen Duck.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

2 to 9 February 1731 No. 117 2 p.
· Poem entitled "Few Happy Matches."
· Translation of Latin verses.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
9 to 16 February 1731 No. 118 2 p.
· Story of intimidating letters throughout London demanding money and threatening death.
· Reply of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts to the governor's letter from issue number 115. House apologizes for the inability to come to a decision regarding the governor's salary and swearing loyalty to the king.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

23 February to 4 March 1731 No. 120 2 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Gaining popularity of the smallpox inoculation.
· Blurb about a man who walked 20 miles in 10 hours for 20 Guineas.
· Note announcing that the newspaper will now be published on Thursdays, once weekly.
· Note verifying the small amount of burials in the city.

4 to 11 March 1731 No. 121 4 p.
· "Extract from the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Of procuring the Small-Pox by Inoculation, by Dr. Timonius, from Constantinople."
· Gov. Belcher's (Ma.) speech (which has taken on an annoyed tone) to the assembly regarding his salary, the blatant disregard for the king's wishes. Assembly decides that no member shall be excused from the meeting to vote on the whether the issue of the governor's salary will be further deferred.
· Assembly decides not to set a salary for the governor but will appoint a committee to do so.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

11 to 18 March 1731 No. 122 4 p.
· Poem entitled "The Shunamite" by Stephen Duck.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

18 to 25 March 1731 No. 123 4 p.
· Essay on charity and compassion.
· "Verses on St. Patrick's Day: sacred to Mirth and Good-Nature" by Philanthopos

25 March to 1 April 1731 No. 124 4 p.
· Royal order to the American people regarding new piracy policies and procedures in the Caribbean.
· Essay on man's lack of want for wisdom (as opposed to money, rank…)
· "Colley Cibber opposes Stephen Duck for the Place of Poet Laureat to his Majesty."
· Parts of Gov. Belcher's (Ma.) speech regarding his salary and how the assembly's responsibility to determine one stems from the fact that provinces raise money for the purpose of supporting its government.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

1 to 8 April 1731 No. 125 4 p.
· Speech of Robert Johnson, governor of South Carolina, to the General Assembly, regarding his new appointment and his wish to accomplish some work before the session ends. Mentions the king's purchase of 7/8's of the Lord Proprietor's Charter, "whereby you are become under his immediate Government…" Plans to promote the prosperity of S.C. and hopes everyone will have the best of intentions for the future of S.C.
· Problems with Protestants in France.
· Poem from a subscriber discussing gods and mythology.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

8 to 15 April 1731 No. 126 4 p.
· Rumor of a usurpation of the throne in the Netherlands.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Address from the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament to the king regarding the "fatal Consequences" surrounding the Treaty of Vienna which were not in vain as the treaty dissolved "that dangerous Union." Also mentions the Treaty of Seville. Includes King George II's answer.
· Address from the House of Commons to the king regarding the Treaty of Seville.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Queen of France is having another child.
· Gov. Gordon's daughter, Philadelphia, married his Secretary, Robert Charles.

22 to 29 April 1731 No. 128 4 p.
· Exhibition for the royal family at St. James's House of a printing press and cases for composing. The two youngest princesses "composed their own names."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

29 April to 6 May 1731 No. 129 4 p.
· Overview of Cape Fear, North Carolina, for prospective settlers. To be continued…
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

6 to 13 May 1731 No. 130 4 p.
· "Remainder of the Account of Cape-Fear, Begun in our last."
· Except from Chambers' Universal Dictionary on the Society of Free Masons. Note: Franklin was one of 13 Mason signers of the Constitution.
· Account of the mutiny aboard Captain Scot's sloop the Little George by the slaves he was transporting.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

13 to 20 May 1731 No. 131 4 p.
· Poem entitled "A Journey from Patapsco to Annapolis," "a description of the spring in these parts of America…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Treatise on the "heathen story" of Prometheus.
· One of the Princes of Georgia (Russia) living in Mount Ararat has promised to send the Czarina a relic from Noah's Arc.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.


20 to 27 May 1731 No. 132 4 p.
INVENTORY TO COME

27 May to 3 June 1731 No. 133 4 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

3 to 10 June 1731 No. 134 4 p.
· Franklin's (?) first annual apology for offending his readers.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

10 to 17 June 1731 No. 135 4 p.
· Speech of Gov. Belcher (Ma.) to the assembly. State of the state address, hopes for the future of the province.
· For the Queen's birthday (March 1) the cornerstone of a theater was placed with a Latin inscription (published).
· Notice of Great Britain's national debt.
· Description of cranial surgery.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

17 to 24 June 1731 No. 136 4 p.
· "Spectator, No. 447" Essay on the effect of custom (routine) on human nature.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

1 to 8 July 1731 No. 138 4 p.
· A "Paper drawn up by the Barbadoes agents, and presented, one to each Member of Parliament as they went into the House; Entitled, The Case of the British Sugar Colonies."
· Speech of Gov. Belcher (Ma.) thanking the assembly for finally passing a bill for his salary. Apologizes for "what I have said to you and my former Assemblies…" Chastises them for the way they have been "supplying the Treasury" because it goes against the Charter. He then says "For these Reasons it is, that I can by no means five my consent to this Bill…" He trusts they will find a solution to the problem. (see issue 190)
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Smallpox has almost completely left the city.



22 to 29 July 1731 No. 141 4 p.
· Monument to Isaac Newton his nearly complete. Latin inscription published.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.


29 July to 5 August 1731 No. 142 4 p.
· From the Weekly Journal, an article on worms in horses.
· Winners of a horse race in Philadelphia announced.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.


5 to 12 August 1731 No. 143 4 p.
· "Extract from the Political State for the Months of February and March 1731." Mortality rates for London with a description of the deaths and diseases therein. To be continued…
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

12 to 19 August 1731 No. 144 4 p.
· Continuation of "Extract from the Political State for the Months of February and March 1731." To be continued.
· From Lime, CT, the successful grafting of two apple trees has produced apples.
· "Extract from the Political State for the Months of February and March 1731."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

19 to 26 August 1731 No. 145 4 p.
· Proclamation by Gov. Patrick Gordon (Pa.) regulating trade with the Indians. Subjects must not deal with Indians in the woods unless the Indians "are recommended and licensed, as by an Act…Entituled, An Act to prohibit the selling of Rum and other strong Liquors to the Indians, and to prevent the Abuses that may happen thereby…" Offenders will be executed.
· Continuation of "Extract from the Political State for the Months of February and March 1731."
· Breakdown of the races of the deceased in Boston, 1730-1731.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Massachusetts governor Belcher issued a proclamation rehashing the "Treaty of Peace and Neutrality in America, between the two crowns of Great Britain and France…which the Subjects of each Crown are forbid to enter with the Vessels into the Ports or Places in America possessed by the other…"

26 August to 2 September 1731 No. 146 4 p.
· "Some Account of the Island of Corsica." History and geography of Corsica "as out foreign papers produce little worth Notice…" To be continued…
· The Lent Preacher of St. Nicholas (Rome) having been imprisoned for a "facetious" sermon, "perhaps had a mind to be jested into Heaven."
· Smallpox rampant in NYC.
· 3 acts passed by the Ma. assembly: better curing and culling of fish; better regulation of swine; and encouraging the killing of wild cats.
· Poem entitled "Verses on the Art of Printing."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

2 to 9 September 1731 No. 147 4 p.
· "The Remainder of the Affairs of Corsica, begun in our last."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

9 to 23 September 1731 No. 148 4 p.
· From the Hague: "All our letters from France continue full of the resentment of that crown, which (they say) is ready to be burnt upon the Kingdom of Great Britain. They would persuade us, that his most Christian Majesty will make use of the King of Spain, notwithstanding his declaration, to revenge the Injury he imagines he has received at the Hands of the English…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

23 to 30 September 1731 No. 149 4 p.
· In Lisbon, 12 people are burned in an Auto da Fe.
· Small notice which reads, "A Grant is passing the Seals for Mr. Booth, Mr. Wilks, and Mr. Cibber, to erect and form Companies for acting Tragedies, Comedies, Operas, etc. for the Term of 21 years." Note: Did some perfunctory research, and there is no relation. "He was born in S. Pancras Parish, London, May 1, 1676, and he died on board of a steamboat, in the Mississippi river, November 30, 1852. His grandfather, John Booth, was a silversmith. His grandmother, Elizabeth Wilkes, was a relative of that able demagogue, Wilkes the Agitator. His father, Richard Booth, was a lawyer, and a Briton who, believing in "Wilkes and Liberty," also reverenced the character of Washington-a different man from the member for Middlesex." http://www.wayneturney.20m.com/boothjb.htm
· From the Daily Journal (London): If last year's salary offer of 3000 l. to Governor Belcher (Ma.) is re-offered by the assembly, he will accept.
· A new treaty between Vienna, Spain and Great Britain.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Smallpox, flu and fever are epidemic in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
·
7 to 14 October 1731 No. 151 4 p.
· "An Essay on Temperance."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.



14 to 21 1731 No. 152 4 p.
· "Pulgah to his Daughter Shual, Anno Mundi 1500." "…a Piece of great Antiquity being wrote about 200 Years before the Flood…" Gives her advice on living life to its fullest and being true to God.
· By George II, "An Act to prevent counterfeiting the [sailes], commonly called Mediterranean passes."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· In Philadelphia, "a court of Admiralty was opened here for the trying of Pirates…"

21 to 28 October 1731 No. 153 4 p.
· Annual meeting speech by Gov. Patrick Gordon (Pa.) to assembly. Gordon plans to share excerpts of his majesty's letters with members and adds that the dispute between the Honourable Proprietors and the Lord Proprietor of Maryland is nearly over. Assembly is pleased with the governor's news.
· Battle between Turks and Persians. Sophi Prince Thamas drowned escaping.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

28 October to 4 November 1731 No. 154 4 p.
· Poem entitled "Good Advice to an old Miser" by "Misophilargus." Describes an old man's physicality and impending death.
· "Apollo and Daphne, a Dialogue."
· The death of Sophi Thamas has been judged untrue.
· A "Physick Garden" will be built at Cambridge University in order to "prevent young Gentlemen who are educated in that Science…of going abroad to study in Foreign Universities."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

4 to 11 November 1731 No. 155 2 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

11 to 18 November 1731 No. 156 4 p.
· "Extract of the new Treaty concluded at Vienna the 22d of July 1731, between the Emperor, the King of Great Britain, and the King of Spain." Includes 2 secret articles of the treaty.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in NYC.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.




18 to 27 November 1731 No. 157 4 p.
· Speech of Gov. Patrick Gordon (Pa.) to Representatives of Freedmen of Pa. regarding Sugar Islands and trade, French fortifications near Albany, and repeal of "law for establishing Courts of Judicature."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

27 November to 2 December 1731 No. 158 4 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

2 to 14 December 1731 No. 159 3 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

21 to 28 December 1731 No. 161 2 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Reports of counterfeiting.

28 December to 4 January 1732 No. 162 2 p.
· Poem to Queen Caroline entitled "A Poem on Providence" by Stephen Duck.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Reports of counterfeiting.

4 to 11 January 1732 No. 163 2 p.
· From Boston Gazette, Gov. Belcher's (Ma.) salary has been approved for 1000 l. per annum. Belcher replies with reasons why he should be earning more.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Reports of counterfeiting.

11 to 18 January 1732 No. 164 2 p.
· Discussion of ethics as relates to horse thievery (response to an article from two years ago regarding the shooting of a horse by a man who thought it was a deer. The owner wanting retribution, the shooter wrote to the paper looking for advice).
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

18 to 25 January 1732 No. 165 2 p.
· Letters to the printer regarding horse theft ethics.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Spread of smallpox and success of inoculation.

25 January to 1 February 1732 No. 166 2 p.
· Answer of House of Representative to Gov. Belcher's speech. Discusses trade, the Quakers, gov.'s salary, French encroachments at Crown's Point, and militia.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.


8 to 15 February 1732 No. 168 2 p.
· Translation of a letter from Palatines (Germans - mostly Protestants) to the Revered Mr. Weys regarding being "poor and abandoned sheep" and looking to be rescued from the shipmaster who abused them on the voyage to Rhode-Island from Rotterdam.
· Story of a man threatening to kill his wife if she did not put her tongue in his mouth. He then bit a large part of it off and threw it into the fire saying "Let this be for a Burnt-Offering."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

15 to 22 February 1732 No. 169 2 p.
· "Extract from the Votes of the House of Representatives. The Report of the Committee to prepare a Draught of a Remonstrance with Respect to the Supply of the Treasury…"
· Letter from Pa. Governor to Ma. Governor regarding the Palatines' (Germans) situation. Gordon wants to first rescue the Germans and second, bring the shipmaster to justice.

22 to 29 February 1732 No. 170 2 p.
· Excerpt from the "Journal of the Honourable House of Representatives" regarding voting for accommodation of "Narragansett Soldiers and their Descendants with a suitable Quantity of Land for their Settlement, as an Acknowledgment and Reward of their great Services to this Country…"
· Discourse on man's fascination with body worms.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

29 February to 7 March 1732 No. 171 2 p.
· "Carolina" written in right margin.
· Report of a paracentesis, or abdominal tap, on a sailor in South Carolina. 10 quarts of water extracted.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

7 to 16 March 1732 No. 172 2 p.
· Edict from King of Portugal granting "leave to Vasco Lourenco Velozo." Charts the voyage's course and purpose. "The English Consul has warned all British Merchants in Portugal, against being concerned in this Company."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

23 to 30 March 1732 No. 174 2 p.
· Letter to the printer signed "Marcus" discussing skepticism and relative truths.
· A new throne is being made in the House of Lords.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.



30 March to 6 April 1732 No. 175 2 p.
· Terrorist activity in London - a barrel of gunpowder placed under a bridge on King's Road "in order to blow up his Majesty."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

6 to 13 April 1732 No. 176 4 p.
· Essay on cunning/knavery and simplicity of thought throughout the history of man.
· Blurb about a man wanting to hang his wife "for what reason is not mentioned" and having tied to noose around her neck, he "fell down dead, by which the Woman's Life was preserved."
· The Princesses Amelia and Mary both won the lottery.
· King of Morocco went amongst his people in disguise "and now knowing them full well…governing with a very strict Hand…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

13 to 20 April 1732 No. 177 2 p.
· Essay on the shamefully poor defenses of religion.
· From the Political State, the Assembly of Ma. has decided on Belcher's salary (1000 l.) and the problems that have ensued.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

20 to 27 April 1732 No. 178 4 p.
· George II's speech to both Houses regarding "the general Tranquility of Europe" (especially the Quadruple Alliance) in which Great Britain had a great hand.
· Address from Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament to George II regarding pros and cons of recent treaties and good work the king has done.
Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

27 April to 4 May 1732 No. 179 4 p.
· Letter to the printer signed "Prosit" discussing censorship at the Mercury. Author rants about his enemies and censorship of his essays on religion. Adds, critics don't understand his retaliation with "'Tis beneath me to return railing for railing, etc."
· Chart of the monthly paracentesis, or abdominal tap, of a London woman, in gallons.
· House's inhabitants fearing its contents were a child, a basket left on a doorstep went uncovered until someone opened it and found a starving dog.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

4 to 11 May 1732 No. 180 4 p.
· Notice that state of the Sugar Colonies will be discussed in House of Commons.
The first issue published solely by Franklin.

11 to 18 May 1732 No. 181 4 p.
· Essay entitled "A Method to make shallow fresh Rivers navigable, for Skows, Flats, Barges, and such like Vessels." To be continued…
· King Louis XV's "Order for shutting up the little Church Yard of St. Medard, where the Abbot Paris lies interr'd…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

18 to 25 May 1732 No. 182 4 p.
· Anonymous essay drawing on the Latin verse at the top by Pers. Sat. v. 69, etc., regarding the rampant vices of ancient Romans and how it is appropriate today. Also critiques unnamed (but obvious, see No. 183) translator of the Latin passage and continues to translate it "for the Benefit of my English Reader.'
· Letter to printer discussing recent upswing in lovers committing suicide when their beloveds refuse to marry them. The author, a woman, recounts her own story of a despaired fiancé, and includes a funny poem that suites the occasion.
· Sinking of books and manuscripts of the Righteous Reverend the Lord Bishop of St. Asaph. "They are so much damaged, that they are obliged to take them in Pieces, and dry them on lines…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

25 May to 1 June 1732 No. 183 4 p.
· Open letter to readers and printers regarding aging population and importance of their contributions to society. Discusses betterment of society.
· Continuation of "A Method to make shallow fresh Rivers navigable, for Skows, Flats, Barges, and such like Vessels."
· Rebuttal to criticism from last issue by Anonymous translator.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

1 to 8 June 1732 No. 184 4 p.
· By the author of "Proposal for making Rivers navigable" comes "A Proposal to have more Plenty of Fish in our Fresh Waters."
· Address by Council of Jamaica to the king discussing state of the state and future prospects.
· Acts pass "for the more easy Recovery of Debts due the Merchants of Great Britain, in the American plantations" and "for preventing the Importation of Hops into Ireland, from America…"
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

8 to 15 June 1732 No. 185 4 p.
· Letter from King of Dauhomay and Emperor of Paupau, Trudo Audato, to King George II regarding trade and future diplomatic relations between the two kingdoms. As a token of friendship, Audato offers a gift of 40 slaves "and if you desire it, forty times forty are at your service." To be continued… Note: Judging by the context of the letter, Audato represents a newly formed kingdom in Africa that has recently overthrown their repressors.
· Discusses the great loss of literature from the fire at the Cottonian Library including one of the original Magna Cartas, original Privy Council Books, a collection of English History, "A clearer View of this Treasure may be seen in that excellent and useful Catalogue, drawn up by Dr. Thomas Smith, the former Librarian…" Note: The fire started in the chimney of the cook's fireplace set fire to the roof, and flames soon destroyed the entire building. The librarians ran into the burning building and saved as many manuscripts as they could before rescue became impossible.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

15 to 19 June 1732 No. 186 4 p.
· Letter from King of Dauhomay and Emperor of Paupau, Trudo Audato, continued.
· Speech of Gov. Belcher (Ma.) to General Assembly regarding laws and instructions handed down from the king (for the safety of the province, for the "Importation of Negroes and Felons into this Province", gov.'s salary)
· A riddle in the form of a poem. The winner: "Who in good Verse explains me clear, Shall have this Gazette, free, one year."

19 to 26 June 1732 No. 187 4 p.
· Essay on the many forms of benefaction, focuses especially on those people who can afford to be benefactors and aren't.
· Letter by "Belinda" on the awkwardness of men in pursuit of women. Recounts her story of a bumbling suitor and writes in her article that she may consider him for a husband if only he relaxed around her.
· Letter for Mr. Casuist asking if it is acceptable to sleep with the spouse of the person who has slept with your spouse.
· Speech of William Gooch, governor of Virginia, to the House of Burgesses regarding the "improving [of] our Staple and Trade" tobacco.
· Answers to the riddle.

26 June to 3 July 1732 No. 188 4 p.
· Address of Va. Assembly to Gov. Gooch in response to his tobacco speech. Gooch thanks Assembly for their support.
· Address of House of Burgesses to Gooch regarding the act passed on tobacco trade.
· To the printer from the Casuist regarding the ethics of sleeping with the spouse of the person who has slept with your spouse. "Return not Evil for Evil, but repay Evil with Good."
· Ma. Journal of the Honourable House of Representatives: asking Belcher to oppose an act imposing duties on slaves.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.




3 to 10 July 1732 No. 189 4 p.
· Letter to the printer regarding a spendthrift wife and her miserly father.
· Minutes from the King's Privy Council dealing mostly with Belcher's salary issues and Ma. Bay.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

10 to 17 July 1732 No. 190 4 p.
· Poem entitled "Food for Criticks."
· "Articles of Friendship and Commerce" between Gov. Robert Johnson (S.C.) and several Indian tribes.
· Report "by the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations" on duty-free trade in America.
· Ma. Journal of the Honourable House of Representatives: Belcher's speech regarding the blatant disregard for his wishes regarding the "Supply of the Treasury." (see issue 138)
· Assembly replies that they have passed the buck onto the "other Branch of Legislature," the House.
· House voted on "Whether the Charter granted this Province, or any clause therein, does forbid this Court supplying the Treasury in a Way and Manner Proposed…" The House found that they can continue to supply the treasury.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Cambridge (Boston) graduation.

17 to 24 July 1732 No. 191 4 p.
· Letter to printer (Mr. Gazetteer) from Cecilia Single. "I must needs tell you that some of the Things you print do more Harm than Good" and related how a recently published letter has "broken the Peace of several Families."
· Answer of HOR to Belcher's speech inserted in issue 186.
· Price chart of goods traded between the Creek Indians and the traders of S.C.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

24 to 31 July 1732 No. 192 4 p.
· Debate over a letter sent from Boston to London discussing the linen industry. Franklin writes a rebuttal that presupposes that the author of the original letter was trying to give the New Englanders a bad reputation.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

7 to 14 August 1732 No. 194 4 p.
· Letter of welcome from Gov. Gordon (Pa.) to Thomas Penn, the Proprietor. Penn's thanks in response. Note: Son of William Penn.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.



14 to 21 August 1732 No. 195 4 p.
· King George II's speech to both Houses regarding state of the kingdom.
· "Extract of the Votes of the House of Commons."
· Address of the Mayor, etc. to W. Cosby, NY Gov., regarding his safe arrival, province safety, trade, and Cosby's future success. Cosby responds with thanks.
· Cosby's speech to the Assembly discussing his future plans.
· Welcome Address of the Assembly to Thomas Penn.
· Poem in honor of Thomas Penn.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

28 August to 7 September 1732 No. 197 4 p.
· Essay on censure "or backbiting" and scandal.
· From the Political State a memorial presented to states General by Lord Chesterfield.
· A welcome address to Thomas Penn from the "Minister, Church-Wardens, and Vestry of Christ-Church in Philadelphia." Penn's thanks in response.
· Meeting of the Chiefs of the six Indian nations with Penn "in order to renew the ancient Chain of Friendship…"

7 to 12 September 1732 No. 198 4 p.
· Letter to "Mr. Gazetteer" by "Alice Addertongue" regarding her enjoyment of past submissions. Becomes an essay on scandal.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

5 to 9 October 1732 No. 202 2 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

12 to 19 December 1732 No. 212 2 p.
· Counterfeit money story.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

19 to 28 December 1732 No. 213 2 p.
· Votes of the HOR Ma.
· "Answer to the Governor's [Belcher] Speech" from the Assembly regarding the treasury.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

28 December to 4 January 1733 No. 214 2 p.
· Addresses of welcome to Lord Baltimore and his Lady lately arrived in Annapolis.
· Welcome address from the Quakers to Lord Baltimore.
· Welcome address from the Clergy of Maryland to Lord Baltimore.
· Welcome address from the Clergy of Maryland to Lady Baltimore.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

4 to 11 January 1733 No. 215 2 p.
· Letter to Franklin from N.N. regarding rude people who laughed at him after falling on the ice twice.
· To the printer from "Chatter-box" regarding author's genealogy. Play-on words with author's name, as he is related to the "Box" family.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· Counterfeit money story.

18 to 25 January 1733 No. 217 2 p.
· Poem discussing stars and other heavenly bodies.
· Welcome address from the Swedish Clergy to Thomas Penn. Penn's thanks.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

25 January to 1 February 1733 No. 218 2 p.
· Letter to the printer regarding the dangers of excessive drinking, drunkenness, and alcohol in general.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

1 to 8 February 1733 No. 219 2 p.
· "Abstract of a Discourse in Honour of the Queen."
· "The…Lines were wrote on her Majesty's setting up the Bustoes of Mr. Locke, Sir Isaac Newton, Mr. Woolaston, and Dr. Clarke, in the Hermitage at Richmond."
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

8 to 15 February 1733 No. 220 2 p.
· A water engine has been built in Boston.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.
· All Philadelphia news reports deaths.

15 to 22 February 1733 No. 221 2 p.
· Breakdown of the religions of the recently buried in Philadelphia cemeteries.

22 to 28 February 1733 No. 222 2 p.
· Discussion of the plight of the Turks.
· Story about a captured polar bear which can now be seen in Boston. (follow-up, see issue 277)

28 February to 8 March 1733 No. 223 2 p.
· Letter from the Primate of Poland to George II regarding the former's feelings and respect for the latter.
· London: A barbers' union-of-sorts has a meeting to discuss prices and products.



15 to 22 March 1733 No. 225 2 p.
· Letter to the printer to publish a poem inspired by the Queen's bust dedications.
· From London: The Earl of Darby has offered 50 l. p.a. to each of the "Trustees for settling the new Colony of Georgia" with poor families. (A kickback?!)

22 to 29 March 1733 No. 226 2 p.
· Governor Gordon's (Pa.) speech to the Assembly discussing his pride in their hard work and the state of the state. Assembly in agreement.

29 March to 5 April 1733 No. [227] 225 (Misnumbered on Gazette) 2 p.
· Queen met with the Gardiner at the Physick Garden at Chelsea and touched him deeply.
· Report of a much gambled boxing match.

5 to 12 April 1733 No. 228 2 p.
· Free Mason meeting reported to have raised 50 l. for charity.
· King George II's speech to both Houses regarding raising supplies for the defense of the kingdom. King's thanks in reply to the Houses' addresses (not included).

12 to 19 April 1733 No. 229 2 p.
· Report of "sea-worms" in the dikes of North Holland.
· Earthquake in Venice.
· Possible volcanoes in Prague?
· Poem written at Sally's Chop-house (London) published.

19 to 26 April 1733 No. 230 2 p.
· Letter discussion the expulsion of the Jesuits from Paraguay.
· Jailing of imposters.

3 to 10 May 1733 No. 232 2 p.
· Penn and Gordon (Pa.) traveled to Burlington to visit Gov. Cosby (NY).

10 to 17 May 1733 No. 233 2 p.
· "An Account of the Progress of the first Colony sent to Georgia."
· Verse by a Member of Parliament regarding upcoming parliamentary elections.

17 to 24 May 1733 No. 234 2 p.
· "Wm. Funney" and "John Jones" written atop page 2
· "An Account of a Voyage to, and Remarks made at Georgia.

24 to 31 May 1733 No. 235 4 p.
· Letter to printer from the wife of a drunk, gambling husband who bought gaming tables to keep him home and found that strong tea replaced the liquor. Signed "Patience Teacraft"
· Abstract of news from surrounding provinces.
· King of Prussia persecuting his subjects.
· "Little Robin the Butler's little short Verses to little Kitty the Cook's Daughter."
· Address from the Directors of the Library Company of Philadelphia to Thomas Penn regarding the building of a common library and public education. Penn replies that he will promote the erecting of a library.

31 May to 7 June 1733 No. 236 4 p.
· Trouble in Poland
· A young girl asked her brother what "school exercises" he was writing and he replied "Verses." Thinking that was simple enough, the girl sat down to write them for her brother but asked "what he would have her write upon? 'What but Paper' replied he smartly." Poem about paper is printed.

14 to 21 June 1733 No. 238 4 p.
· "A Discourse on the Principles of some Modern Infidels; occasioned by several late Books and Pamphlets."
· King George II went to the House of Peers and gave "the Royal Assent" to several administrative bills.
· Posthumous criminal confession.
· Belcher's (Ma.) welcome speech to the new assembly.
· "Extract of Votes of the Honourable House of Representatives."

21 to 28 June 1733 No. 239 4 p.
· Essay entitled "Of Good Nature." Good Nature, like the fertile soil of Paradise, yields Pleasures unknown to the vulgar…"
· South Carolina Commons House of Assembly setting precedents regarding Freedom of Speech and Writ of Habeas Corpus.
· Society of Free and accepted Masons meeting.

28 June to 5 July 1733 No. 240 4 p.
· Letter to the printer discussing conveniency versus inconveniency. Includes a French poem.
· "Extract from the Votes of the House of Commons" on tobacco duties from "British plantations…"
· Report of James Oglethorpe's journey from Savannah to Charlestown for a summit with Indian chiefs.
· "The Sugar, Rum, and Melasses Act…passed the House of Lords…"

5 to 12 July 1733 No. 241 4 p.
· Letter to the printer chastising people who talk behind others' backs.
· Poem entitled "Gently touch the warbling Lyre; Burlesq'd by Sir W---- Y-----" about food. In English and "Attempted in Latin."
· M. Potocki (usurper of Polish throne?) will marry Princess Elizabeth, daughter of late Czar of Russia Peter I.
· From Charlestown: The Creek and Cherokee Indians are at war with one another.
· "Extract from the Journal of the Hon. House of Representatives" of Belcher's speech saying he will continue to refuse signing a bill allowing the current method of supplying the treasury to continue. The House decided that tomorrow, they will consider the problem. Next day: House voted, in the negative, on the question "Whether the House…will project any other Method for Supply of the Treasury that the Bill already passed…?"
· House discussion of a warm welcome (reception) for James Oglethorpe this summer.
· Act passed granting Belcher 3000 l. per annum.
· Belcher glad about Oglethorpe situation, but will host the reception himself since there is no money in the treasury for such an occasion and until the House has anew means of supplying it, Belcher will not make "your Vote an order of this Court."

12 to 19 July 1733 No. 243 (should read 242) 4 p.
· Essay entitled "Of Anger, Envy, and Malice."
· Love letter from a school master with a grammatical twist.
· News of James Oglethorpe's adventures in the South.

26 July to 2 August 1733 No. 244 4 p.
· Letter to the printer regarding the importance of writing well in all aspects of life.
· Dispatch of a "Burning Vulcano" in County Kerry.
· Speech of James Oglethorpe to the Assembly of S.C. thanking everyone for a warm welcome to America and looking ahead to the future of the colonies.
· Statistics of patients treated, discharged, died, and still admitted to several London hospitals.
· Account of a two-headed cat born in Philadelphia.

2 to 9 August 1733 No. 245
NEED INVENTORY

9 to 16 August 1733 No. 246 4 p.
· Fable entitled "The Benefit of having a Trade in one's Belly. A short History."
· Chickasaw and Notchee Indian Chiefs to Charlestown to pay respect to the Gov.

16 to 23 August 1733 No. 247 4 p.
· King George II's speech to both Houses closing this session of Parliament with a recap of the first year.




23 to 30 August 1733 No. 248 4 p.
· Letter to "Mr. Gazetteer" discussing the exclusion of "molattoes" from both white and black society.
· From the House of Commons, votes regarding the sale of lands and the Sugar Colonies.
· Books have been donated to Harvard and Yale Colleges.

30 August to 7 September 1733 No. 249 4 p.
· Belcher's speech to assembly regarding the public treasury.
· Report of the King's Privy Council (includes a complaint from Jonathan Belcher).
· Addresses by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament and the House of Commons to King George II regarding the possible marriage of the eldest Princess to the Prince of Orange.
· Short poem about love published.

7 to 14 September 1733 No. 250 4 p.
· Essay on patriotism and public spirit.
· Act promoting Sugar Colony trade. To be continued…
· "Extract from the Votes of the Hon. House of Commons" - sale of lands as dowry to Prince of Orange...
· "…a curious piece of machinery, shewing the Annual and Diurnal Motion of the Earth and Planets around the Sun; also the Motion of the Moon around the Earth…"
· Celebration in Holland over impending marriage of Prince of Orange and the Princess Royal.

14 to 21 September 1733 No. 251 4 p.
· Welcoming address to Thomas Penn by Andrew Hamilton, president of the justices of Kent County. Penn's thanks in response.
· Act promoting Sugar Colony trade, continued.
· "Czarina of Muscovy persists in her Resolution to oppose the Election of King Stanislas…"(May 19)
· King Stanislas' election is in the bag (June 5).
· Belcher's speech to the House regarding the treasury, future colony settlements.
· Negative vote on a day of public Prayer and Humiliation (fasting) by HOR in Boston.
· Response of HOR signed by Speaker J. Quincy.

28 September to 5 October 1733 No. 253 4 p.
· The Muscovites have invaded Poland.
· Thomas Griffits elected mayor of Philadelphia. Lists all newly elected officials.




28 September to 11 October 1733 No. 254 4 p.
· Discussion of great Romans, how they are often misquoted/mis-referenced today.
· "An Account of the Instalment of the Prince of Orange in the Order of the Garter"
· Issue includes only international news.

11 to 18 October 1733 No. 255 4 p.
· Jeremiah Langhorne elected Speaker of the Assembly for Pennsylvania.

18 to 25 October 1733 No. 256 4 p.
· "Latter Part of the Lords Protest against applying Part of the Sinking Fund to other Uses; and concerning the Excise."
· Poem entitled "On a Spider and a Poet."
· Vienna: Emperor's letter to the Primate of Poland.
· HOR in Boston will revisit the treasury issue tomorrow.

25 October to 1 November 1733 No. 257 4 p.
· Several reports about King Stanislas and his upcoming "election."

1 to 8 November 1733 No. 258 4 p.
· Article from the Weekly Miscellany regarding founding of Georgia as a colony.
· Account of General Lasci's (Lacy's) (Russian) invasion of Poland.
· Political support for 4 members of Parliament "with a View to the next Election."

16 to 22 November 1733 [Most likely misdated. Probably 9-16 Nov.] No. 259 4 p.
· Short history for background on current election in Poland.
· From the Universal Journal "'A Sermon Occassioned by the Death of Rev. Mr. Proctor, Minister of Gissing.' By the Rev. Mr. Moor, Minister of Buston in Norfolk."

16 to 22 November 1733 No. 261 6 p.
· News and letter discussing Polish invasion.
· "Manifesto, or Oath, resolv'd upon in the Diet of Election at Warsaw."
· King of France has declared war against Germany.
· Saxon troops in Russian trying to get the Prince of Saxony on the throne.

29 November to 6 December 1733 No. 262 4 p.
· Irish bakers on strike.
· Irish Butchers and Weavers at odds after a butcher killed a weaver.





6 to 13 December 1733 No. 263 4 p.
· King George II presented with published manifesto on occasion of Louis XV "declaring war against the Emperor." Poland a great source of friction. To be continued…(see issue 273)
· War expected in Poland.
· Address of Magistrates (County of Sussex) to Thomas Penn welcoming him and asking for his support for their religious and civil rights. Penn supports them.

13 to 20 December 1733 No. 264 4 p.
· Letter to publisher from Pennsilvanus praising firefighters.
· Dublin "The North-Countryman's Description of Christ-Church."
· Bio of King Stanislas and his lineage/right to the throne.
· State of the state speech of Gov. Gordon (Pa.) to the Reps. of the Freedmen.

20 to 31 December 1733 No. 265 4 p.
· "A new candidate for the Crown of Poland" letter by Dearmot Mac Bavuish (cousin of Stanislas).
· Poem entitled "On the Queen and the Bustoes plac'd in her Grotto."
· Speech of Reps. of the Freedmen in reply to Gov. Gordon (Pa.) (issue 264). Concurring sentiments.

31 December 1733 to 8 January 1734 No. 266 2 p.
· Gov. Johnson's (S.C.) speech to Council and Lower House regarding phony agents sent to England "misrepresenting all our proceedings, and endeavoring to make us pass for Persons disaffected to His Majesty's Interest…"

8 to 16 January 1734 No. 267 4 p.
· Debate in House of Lords on "punishing Mutiny and Desertion." To be continued…
· Rumors of a war between Great Britain and France.

16 to 23 January 1734 No. 268 4 p.
· Continued Debate in House of Lords on "punishing Mutiny and Desertion." Includes Duke of Argyle's speech, to be continued…
· Poem entitled "In Praise of Virtue."
· Philadelphia: acts passed "to prevent the Exportation of Flour not merchantable" and to repeal the Excise Tax.

23 to 30 January 1734 No. 269 4 p.
· Duke of Argyle's speech on mutiny continued.
· Gov. Belcher gives speech in Portsmouth, NH, on French declaration of war.

30 January to 7 February 1734 No. 270 4 p.
· Poem entitled "The Cobbler. A Tale."

7 to 13 February 1734 No. 271 2 p.
· French and German version of the Siege of Kehl.
· Oddly, after all the press and scandal, one single line reads "The Elector of Saxony is elected King of Poland."

13 to 20 February No. 272 4 p.
· Essay entitled "The natural Strength and Security of England."
· Description of the impending wedding of the Princess Royal to Prince of Orange.
· Letter to Gov. William Cosby (NY, NJ) by the citizens of Burlington thanking him for incorporating the town.

20 to 27 February 1734 No. 273 4 p.
· Gov. Belcher's speech to the Council and HOR regarding impending war and defense of British forts in America, especially Castle William.
· Remainder of manifesto on occasion of Louis XV "declaring war against the Emperor."
· Gov. Cosby has assured New Yorkers that "no Pains shall be spared nor Time lost in fortifying that City."

27 February to 6 March 1734 No. 274 4 p.
· News about King Stanislas' win (?)
· Belcher gave consent to repairing Castle William and for paying for it with public funds out of the treasury.
· Letter to Franklin, "Thee art desired to insert the following Queries in the Gazette for the Consideration of People." Regarding the French, their ports, and impending war.

6 to 13 March 1734 No. 275 2 p.
· Preparations for Princess Royal's wedding.
· Expulsion of Germans from France.
· News from Poland.
· Another Belcher speech regarding repairing Castle William and for paying for it with public funds out of the treasury.
· "A Paragraph from the Province Law relating to Fire-Arms."

13 to 21 March 1734 No. 276 4 p.
· "Spectator, No. 594" essay chastising telling tales about one another.
· Petition to Gov. Johnson of S.C. asking that before widows marry available bachelors, the "maids [be] provided for." (Slim pickings in Charlestown).
· Vessels "homeward bound" (to England?) are no longer insured "while the present uncertainty of Peace or War continues."
· Poem about drinking.


21 to 28 March 1734 No. 277 4 p.
· Gov. Gordon's (Pa.) state of the state speech to Reps. of Freedmen. Reps. reply of agreement.
· Private letter mentions James Oglethorpe's adventures and Creek Indians.
· "The last Speech and dying words of Terence Roger, who was executed at Chester…for murder."
· Polar bear (from issue 222) being shipped to London.
· Town meeting in Boston discussed fortification repairs.
· Poetic response to last issue's poem about drinking.

28 March to 4 April 1734 No. 278 4 p.
· Essay about the qualities of constancy and the dangers of flip-flopping.
· Political poem.

4 to 11 April 1734 No. 279 4 p.
· "Spectator, No. 451" on scandal.
· Follow-up to Boston town meeting: addition to North Battery and the North-Eastern End, 6 guns prepared for Clark's Warfe, plans for building a fortress.

11 to 18 April 1734 No. 280 4 p.
· Letter to the publisher of the Weekly-Journal submitting a poem about love.
· King Stanislas' manifesto "to engage the Nobility to take Arms in his favour…"

18 to 25 April 1734 No. [281] Written in pencil 4 p.
· "Spectator, No. 422" essay on the false notion of "raillery" (banter/good natured ridicule).
· "The Resolutions of the States of Holland" regarding national/inter'l affairs.
· King George II's speech to both Houses discussing the war with France.

25 April to 2 May 1734 No. 282 4 p.
· Address of the Lords Temporal and Spiritual to the king promising full support and trust that his majesty's councils will help guide his decisions re: war.
· Address of House of Commons discussing their pleasure in the king's waiting to hear from the councils of "those Powers" before making important decisions re: war.
· Description of the battles between the Turks and the Persians.

2 to 9 May 1734 No. 283 4 p.
· Gov. Cosby's (NY, NJ) speech to the assembly of NY regarding "Prosperity of the Province" and "the Causes of its Decay."
· Continuation of James Oglethorpe's adventures in the south.
· "The last Dying Speech and Confession of…" Ziggey John Witness and Thomas Parker.

9 to 16 May 1734 No. 284 4 p.
· Brutal murders of priests and Christians in Algier.
· Cracow: Coronation of King Augustus III is being planned (the Saxon).
· "Oath taken by every Man that enters into the Confederacy for King Augustas is as follows…"
· London: Number of people prosecuted for a variety of misdemeanors.

16 to 23 May 1734 No. 285 4 p.
· Reports from the East India Company about pirates, mutinies, and experiences.
· Letter from Louis XV to King of Dantzick thanking him for support of King Augustus III (Poland).
· Discussion of French army plans and maneuvers.
· "List of Diseases and Casualties this Year" in England.
· NYC: "a Road is ordered to be made of 60 Foot wide clear thro' the Island, and a Guard House to be built at every Mile from one End thereof to the other." For the suppression of "Rebel Negroes."

23 to 30 May 1734 No. 286 4 p.
· Much talk of King Stanislas, Poland, and the Russians.
· King Stanislas will be returning to Dresden instead of "proceeding to Dantzick with his Army."
· Increasing chance of British war with France.

30 May to 6 June 1734 No. 287 4 p.
· War between France and England is imminent.
· King George II's message to Lords Temporal and Spiritual saying he is informed enough to make a decision about war but still relies heavily on his trusted councils.
· King George II's speech to both Houses. Has dissolved the expiration of this parliament, calls for a quick election with respect to the current state of Europe.
·
6 to 13 June 1734 No. 288 4 p.
· Addresses of top politicians in London to the king and queen congratulating tem on the marriage of their daughter to the Prince of Orange. King's thanks in reply.
· "Political Quadrille. A Paper handed about at Paris."

13 to 20 June 1734 No. 289 4 p.
· Essay discussing the death of children and infants.
· Dublin: Strange contents found inside a sow (seven different animal heads joined together…).



20 to 27 June 1734 No. 290 4 p.
· "Dr. Clifton's Prescriptions for the Cure of the Smallpox."
· Court transcript of a murder trial (London).
· King of the Nauchees (Western Indians) and 26 Warriors visited Gov. Johnson (S.C.) to discuss the slaughter of Indians by the French. Creek Indians sailing to England with James Oglethorpe.
· Ben Franklin elected Grand-Master of the Ancient and Honourable Society of Free and Accepted Masons.

27 June to 4 July 1734 No. 291 4 p.
· The history and fate of Dantzick, Capital of Polish-Pomerania. About to be invaded.
· King Augustus is preparing for his return to Poland. Sent his brother to keep General Munich abreast of his plans.
· French vessels off the coast of Scotland.
· Count Munich to Dantzickers/Dantzick sympathizers: Stanislas to leave the city, citizens to ask Pardon of the Russian czarina and King Augustus for having opposed Russian troops, recognize Augustus as their sovereign, and reimburse the Czarina for attacking the city. Magistrates rejected these proposals.
· Philadelphia: Several deaths from the heat.

4 to 11 July 1734 No. 292 4 p.
· "Letter from the Recorder of Savannah [Thomas Christie] in Georgia to…James Oglethorpe."
· Philadelphia: Several deaths from the heat.

11 to 18 July 1734 No. 293 4 p.
· Essay entitled "Seasonable Admonition to Philadelphia. Extract from a late Account of Holland" discussing the passé fad of modesty and frugality in diet, dress, and housing in Holland.
· "Preamble to the Bill for the Naturalization of the Prince of Orange…"
· Dantzickers are successfully fighting off the Russians.
· Boston and Philadelphia: Several deaths from the heat.

18 to 25 July 1734 No. 294 4p.
· House of Lords has decided that each Colony is to send a copy of their laws and giving the crown the right to repeal any it sees unfit. All new laws must be approved within 12 months of passing in America by his majesty (not including emergency defense laws). Governors of CT and RI must take Oaths of Allegiance re: navigation laws in the presence of one of the King's Governors. New trading laws by the king to be enacted.
· Reports of sudden deaths.


25 July to 1 August 1734 No. 295 4 p.
· "Meditation on the Vanity and Brevity of Human Life, wrote in Imitation of the Psalms…"
· Members for the ensuing Parliament listed.
· French troops have arrived at Dantzick.

1 to 8 August 1734 No. 296 4 p.
· News of French invading Philipsburg with 10,000 troops.
· Standoff between Dantzickers, Russians, and Poles.
· According to Franklin, being too much of a censor in his choice of publishable articles, he has all but discouraged submissions. That said, "I give my Readers the two following Letters" (readers not happy with the essay on the brevity of human life, one includes a poem to counterbalance the depressing article from issue 295).

8 to 15 August 1734 No. 297 4 p.
· "Extract from the Report of the Lords of Trade, laid before Parliament…" Mentions CT and RI.
· "Extract of the Ministers of the Dyet of the Empire, containing some of the Reasons alledged by the Ministers of Bavaria in Opposition to the Declaring War against France."
· More Members for the ensuing Parliament listed.
· Letter to Franklin discussing the Germans as "famous for their Penetration into the more dark and abstruse Parts of Learning, such as border upon Magic not excepted."


15 to 22 August 1734 No. 298 4 p.
· Essay on public spirit.
· General Lacy defeated the Polish Army at Dresden and General Diemar defeated 10,000 Poles at Cracow.
· From Paris, description of preparations for Siege of Philipsburg.
· Letter to Dantzick informing them that their continued conduct will lead to the city's utter ruin. Signed by J.G. Kiesling.
· Dantzickers refused all proposals and their fate will soon be determined.

22 to 29 August 1734 No. 299 6 p.
· Poem entitled "A Poreamouth Apple: to Capt. Attwood."
· Description of battle between Dantzickers and Russians.
· The Germans have defeated the French upon the Rhine and French ships were destroyed by the Russian outside of Dantzick.




29 August to 5 September 1734 No. 300 4 p.
· All virgins "from the age of fifteen to forty, shall be disposed of by Lottery" in order to take the financial burden off their parents. In response to the "disuse of Holy Matrimony." Lottery prizes and eligibilities included.
· Daily account of Dantzick.

5 to 12 September 1734 No. 301 4 p.
· Reports from the Russian Camp at Dantzick.
· News of great losses of French near the Rhine.

12 to 19 September 1734 No. 302 4 p.
· Reports from Philipsburg.
· Hague's doting on the new Princess of Orange.
· James Oglethorpe and the Creek Indians arrive in London.
· Gov. Patrick Gordon's (Pa.) wife died.

19 to 25 September 1734 No. 303 4 p.
· The fate of Philipsburg is not looking very good. Gov. of Philipsburg keeps up a strong defense.
· "Act signed by the Polish Lords…for acknowledging King Augustus…"
· "The Old Man of Verona. Translated from Claudian."
· Reports of the French troops all over Europe.
· John Penn, the eldest Proprietor, and his sister, and her family arrived in Philadelphia to a warm welcome and speeches by the Mayor/Commonalty and Presbyterian Ministers of Pennsylvania.
· "Sorrowful Lamentation of Samuel Keimer, Printer of the Barbadoes Gazette." (And the founder of the Pennsylvania Gazette)

25 September to 3 October 1734 No. 304 4 p.
· "A List of all His Majesty's Ship[s in Commission…"
· Conversion of a "Romish Priest" to the "Protestant Religion." "Made a Recantation of the Errors of that Church…"
· King Stanislas forced to go home, shamed, but declared he had a right mind to join the Polish Army.
· The French are looking at a Siege of Mentz once they repair the fortifications at Philipsburg.
· List of recently elected officials in Philadelphia, Chester, Bucks, Lancaster, and Newcastle County.

3 to 10 October 1734 No. 305 4 p.
· Letters of concession to Dantzick and King Augustus III.
· Discussions of the French Army and the areas around the Rhine.
· King Stanislas has escaped under the guise of a peasant.


10 to 17 October 1734 No. 306 4 p.
· News about French conquests and military maneuvers.
· Reports about the state of Dantzick and its future.
· Peace between the Turks and the Persians.

17 to 24 October 1734 No. 307 4 p.
· Speech by Gov. Gordon (Pa.) to the Reps. of the Freedmen on trade and the welfare of Pennsylvania. The Penn Proprietors mentioned.
· Welcome speech to John Penn by Reps. of the Freedmen.
· Indian Chiefs appeared at court in London in their traditional manner.

31 October to 7 November 1734 No. 309 4 p.
· Letters to Count Munich from Marquis de Monti (from Dantzick) regarding the state of that place.
· Reports from the Rhine about the French army.
· Speech by Gov. Belcher (Ma.) to the General Assembly regarding Public Bills of Credit and supplying the Treasury.
· NY: "…it was Resolved, that a Duty of One Shilling per Pound be laid upon all Tea [and other goods] imported into this Province towards erecting Fortifications…"
· "Genealogy of a Jacobite."

28 November to 5 December 1734 No. 313 4 p.
· "An Elegy on the much to be lamented Death of Mr. Richard Lewis, late Master of the Free-School of the City of Annapolis."
· From the Universal Spectator (3 August 1734) "A Remarkable Instance of filial Piety" and an essay on pleasures of the flesh.
· List of new kings/ruling families of countries and their charges.

5 to 12 December 1734 No. 314 4 p.
· Correspondence between George II and the Archbishop of Paris regarding their current situation.
· "A List of Wants. From a Gentleman in the Fleet Prison to his Friend."
· Reports from Italy regarding the French.

12 to 19 December 1734 No. 315 4 p.
· "An Enquiry after true Pleasure. A Fable. By Mr. Dodsley."
· Accounts from both sides (to balance the partisanship) regarding the battles between the Germans and the French in Italy.


See More

People: Franklin, Benjamin, 1706-1790
Meredith, Hugh, ca. 1697-1749

Historical Era: Colonization and Settlement, 1585-1763

Subjects: American StatesmenJournalismGovernment and CivicsGlobal History and US Foreign PolicyGlobal History and US Foreign Policy

Sub Era:

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