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Greene, Nathanael (1742-1786) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.01302 Author/Creator: Greene, Nathanael (1742-1786) Place Written: s.l. Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 10 December 1781 Pagination: 3 p. : address : docket ; 33.2 x 20.5 cm.

Written by Major General Greene to Brigadier General Knox. Marked "private" on address leaf. References Knox's letter of 1 November 1781. Praises Knox and passes along the accolades of Colonel "Light-Horse" Henry Lee "who lately returned from the Northern Army [who] says you are the genius of it and that everything is said of you that you can wish." Calls Knox's operations in Virginia, "brilliant, glorious, great and important." Reports that the spirits of the Southern Army are congenial. Hopes to be able to see him soon when there is an official peace. Says the success in Virginia "gives me the most flattering hopes that this winter will terminate the war." Says the British have been pushed into Charleston and Savannah and that the Southern Army controls the rest of the region. Says this was done without any reinforcements, as General Arthur St. Clair will not arrive for some time. Says he has letters from Philadelphia that say his wife is traveling southward to be with him. Worries about the long trip she will undertake. Postscript says "Dont be surprised if you hear I attempt the siege of Charles town nor must you be disappointed greatly should we fail."

[draft]
Head Quarters
At the round [O?]
Decem 10th 1781
My dear friend
Your favor of the 1st of November has just come to hand and as there is an Express just going off I have only time barely to acknowledge the receipt of it.
What ever sweet things may be said of me there are not less said of you. Col Lee who lately returned from the Northern Army says you are the genius of it and that ever thing is said of you that you can wish. I will not wound your delicacy by repeating his remarks. Your success in Virginia is brilliant[,] glorious, great and important. The Commander in Chiefs head is all covered with laurels; and yours so shaded with them that one can hardly get sight of it[.]
I long to be with you, our spirits are congenial, and our principles and sentiments the same. A long distance seperates [sic] and alas I fear [2] with you we shall not have a happy meeting for a long time to come. But be assured my esteem and affection is neither lessened by time or distance and I hope at some future day when the Cannon shall cease to roar, and the olive branch appear we shall experience a happy meeting. Your great success in Virginia gives me the most flattering hopes that this winter will terminate the war.
I have the pleasure to inform you that we have driven the enemy into Charlestown and have got compleat possession of the three Southern states[,] Charlestown and Savannah excepted. And this has been effected without any reinforcements, for General St Clair is not arrivd, nor will he, for some time to come.
By letters from Philadelphia I am told Mrs Greene is coming to the southward; but I cannot give much credit to it, as the undertaking is so arduous, and I have point to her the dangers and difficulties in such strong colours. However I left her at liberty to follow her own inclinations; and perhaps her wishes [3] has got the better of her prudence. I have a great affection for her, and a great desire to see her; but if she could have been happy or contented to stay at home, I should have been willing to have pos[t]poned our meeting to a more convenient opportunity.
I beg you'll remember me affectionately to Mrs Knox & to your family, and when you write to Col Jackson please to remember me to him. I am glad to hear Lucy and Harry are well. It is these ties and such connections that give pleasure to the soul.
Yours affc
N Greene
Don't be surprised if you hear I attempt the siege of Charles town nor must you be disappointed greatly should we fail
General Knox
[address leaf]
private
General Knox
Northern Army
[docket]
from General Greene Decr
1781

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