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Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03179 Author/Creator: Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) Place Written: Boston, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 15 August 1785 Pagination: 3 p. : address : docket ; 32 x 20.1 cm.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03179 Author/Creator: Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) Place Written: Boston, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 15 August 1785 Pagination: 3 p. : address : docket ; 32 x 20.1 cm.

Colonel Henry Jackson writes to his close friend General Henry Knox on a variety of topics. Writes "I have been Lasey it is true, but cool weather is coming on & I shall be more attentive in future." Discusses the sale of some hardware goods Knox had obtained and the price for which they have been selling in England. Mentions matters of local politics, including letters between the governor and Congress and also disparaging remarks against "our friend B." made in the newspaper. Comments on difficulties with new currency at the bank. Discusses a local dinner party. Finally, describes the current state of their friend Samuel Shaw, Knox's former aide-de-camp, who is "exceeding dull & meloncolly" due to difficulties settling his late father's estate. Has asked Mr. [possibly Robert] Morris to "take his goods out of his hands." Adds, "He frequently converses with me on the subject. I endeavor to keep him up. I wish you could find a berth in your office for him he is ill except of any thing if he can be with you. He considers you, his friend & Father." Sends regards to Mrs. Knox and their children.

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