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Leavenworth, F.P. (fl. 1861) to his father

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC00653.07 Author/Creator: Leavenworth, F.P. (fl. 1861) Place Written: Van Buren, Arkansas Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 18 November 1861 Pagination: 3 p. ; 24.5 x 20 cm.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC00653.07 Author/Creator: Leavenworth, F.P. (fl. 1861) Place Written: Van Buren, Arkansas Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 18 November 1861 Pagination: 3 p. ; 24.5 x 20 cm.

A Confederate captain in an ordnance unit tells his father about Civil War activities in Arkansas and Missouri. Comments on the arrival of Union General David Hunter with 36,000 soldiers. Discusses the strength and position of Confederate General Ben MucCulloch's men. Claims that "The burning of the bridge in Tenn. has virtually cut the Confederacy in two," and consequently the mail has been limited, and may be worse still if Union General William T. Sherman moves into South Carolina. Notes that they have not heard from their enemies in the Creek nation, indicating that Opothleyaholo cannot be found but has a band prowling around. Explains that he expects to close his school and emigrate to South America or Australia. Despondent, he writes and underlines: "There is nothing left, worth fighting for." Comments on the instability he expects even if the Confederacy wins independence. Notes that he has been studying Spanish, asks about the family, and ends with the comment: "Small Pox raging at Fort Smith."

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